Environment

A few months ago WUWM News met three Milwaukee entrepreneurs who set their sights high. They hope to create a commercial aquaculture business in an old factory building in Bay View. The idea is to raise, and then sell, thousands of fish, using a natural filtering system that grows edible plants along the way. WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence visited Sweet Water Organics to see how the business is coming along.

This is a space transformed.

Starting today, WUWM will provide stories on a regular basis, about environmental issues. We begin by meeting the person whose work led to the creation of UWM’s Great Lakes WATER Institute that sits along the shore of Lake Michigan in Milwaukee. WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence introduces us to the man who’s considered by some to be the father of Great Lakes studies.

Dr. Clifford Mortimer is nearly a century old, but he’s not the least bit interested in slowing down.

During World War II Eleanor Roosevelt encouraged Americans to plant Victory Gardens. The First Lady planted hers at the White House and some 20 million Americans followed her lead. They hoped to conserve fuel for the war effort and make sure there was enough food to go around.

Now a grassroots movement is spreading around the country to rekindle the tradition. Over the weekend a group of Milwaukee area residents will help plant vegetable beds in yards and shared spaces. It’s called the Victory Garden Blitz. WUWM’s Susan Bence got in on the group’s first planning meeting and has been watching its momentum grow.

Gretchen Mead calls herself a food activist.

A couple of weeks ago, WUWM News visited a greenhouse on the city’s southside, where 7th & 8th graders manage an aquaculture system. They’re raising fish, using a natural filtering system that cleanses the water and grows edible plants along the way.

A Magnificent Obsession

Apr 22, 2008

Aldo Leopold was a legendary environmentalist and forester. He spent almost two decades working with the U.S. Forest Service in the Southwest. Throughout his life Leopold loved observing, journaling and sketching his surrounding. That didn’t change when he transferred to work in Madison, Wisconsin.

Nina Leopold Bradley was a young girl in 1935, when her father Aldo invited his family on the adventure of a lifetime. A ramshackle farm caught his eye near the Wisconsin River, not far from Baraboo.

Airventure

Jul 30, 2007
S Bence

Every year people who live to build and fly airplanes descend - literally - on Oshkosh Wisconsin for the Experimental Aircraft Association's annual Airventure. What started more than 50 years ago as a gathering of a small groups of devotees has become the biggest such gathering in the world.

WUWM's Susan Bence drove up for an introduction to the spectacle and starts first in the War Birds area, where Stan Marcus from Oconomowoc and some comrades are just back from an early morning flight.

Fleeing to the Market

Jul 20, 2007

Bargaining over one person's treasures and another's trash has become an American past time, but the idea dates back to 19th century France.

Just one hour southwest of Milwaukee one of the area's popular flea markets takes place four times a year in Elkhorn. Dating back to 1982, more than 500 vendors fill every inch of the grounds and squeeze into exhibit barns.

Our audio postcard from the Elkhorn Antique Flea Market was sent to us by Lake Effect's Susan Bence. She begins in the small animal barn.

More than 20 years ago, a movement started to take shape in Rome, when angry Italians reacted to the first McDonalds in Rome. Slow Food International was born; today the nonprofit boasts more than 80,000 members. Their combined mission is to bring local food traditions away from drive-throughs and back into the home kitchen.

Martha Davis Kipcak, Dave Swanson and Steve Hargarten are members of Slow Food Southeast Wisconsin. Susan Bence joins them for dinner, and reports on the slow food movement.

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