Health & Science

Health
4:12 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Scrutiny Of 'Molly' Party Drug Increases After 4 Deaths

Molly, a purified form of Ecstasy, is said to be popular at dance clubs and electronic music festivals.
Alen Popov iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:20 pm

A recent string of deaths in the Northeast from a drug known as Molly has authorities looking into whether a bad batch may be to blame.

Police believe the purified form of the drug known as Ecstasy is what killed four young people in just over a week, and sent many more to emergency rooms. Incidents involving the drug have stretched from Boston to New York and Washington, D.C.

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Health & Science
3:21 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

How Fast Does a Concussed Brain Heal?

A local researcher makes the case that we need to figure out how long it takes the brain to heal from a concussion.
Credit John McStravick/Flickr

Lake Effect's Mitch Teich interviews Dr. Tom Hammeke about his study on concussions.

With football season now underway, concerns are once again heating up about how to treat head injuries.

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The Salt
2:15 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Purple Sweet Potato A Contender To Replace Artificial Food Dyes

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 3:25 pm

We've grown accustomed to choosing our food from a spectacular rainbow — care for an impossibly pink cupcake, a cerulean blue sports drink or yogurt in preppy lavender?

But there's a growing backlash against the synthetic dyes that give us these eye-popping hues. And now scientists are turning to the little-known (and little-grown) purple sweet potato to develop plant-based dyes that can be labeled as nonthreatening vegetable juice.

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Shots - Health News
2:08 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Why Younger Women Could Benefit From Mammograms After All

Mammography detects cancer, but debate rages over when and how often women should get screened.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:10 pm

Women should get screened for breast cancer in their 40s, a study concludes, because they face a greater risk of death when cancers aren't found early.

Women who were diagnosed with cancer in their 40s and died of the disease were more likely to have never had a mammogram than were older women, according to the study.

Seventy percent of the women diagnosed with cancer in their 40s who later died hadn't had a mammogram, compared to 50 percent of women in their 60s. Half of the cancer deaths in the study were in women who had been diagnosed before age 50.

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All Tech Considered
1:26 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Net Neutrality In Court: Here's What You Need To Know

The future of the Internet is at stake in a case before a D.C. court.
Hoang Dinh Nam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 2:27 pm

The beauty of the Internet — and the reason for its ubiquitous place in our lives — is that just about anyone can use it to offer services, products or information. But the link between what's out there on the Internet, how fast it gets to us and how much data can get to us is dependent on Internet service providers and the rules that govern them. That's where things get thorny for the principle of net neutrality.

If your eyes are already glazing over, consider this: This debate could affect the speed, quality and cost of your Hulu or Netflix binge-viewing.

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The Protojournalist
11:16 am
Mon September 9, 2013

The Customization Of You — And Everything Else

NPR

While reading this story on the customization of everything, YOU would discover that it's even possible these days to make yourself the subject of an NPR news story on customization.

In other words, you are reading the story that you are co-writing – about yourself.

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Shots - Health News
6:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Humanitarian Aid Agencies Brace For Fallout From Syrian Strikes

At the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, many families struggle to get clean water, food and health services.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:04 am

The World Health Organization says the Syrian civil war is currently the worst ongoing humanitarian crisis on earth.

Aid groups have been scrambling to provide shelter, food, water and health care to the huge numbers of people who've been uprooted by the fighting. The big question now is whether U.S. military action could spark another wave of refugees and make the situation worse.

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Business
4:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Verizon, FCC Go To Court Over Net Neutrality

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 6:25 am

Opening statements in the court case FCC vs. Verizon begin Monday. This case could determine the FCC's legal ability to enforce the principle known as net neutrality. At issue is whether the federal government may block Internet service providers from slowing or blocking certain online content.

All Tech Considered
2:30 am
Mon September 9, 2013

It's OK To Protest In China, Just Don't March

Security guards stand outside newspaper offices in Guangdong province in January, where banners and flowers were laid in protest of censorship.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:12 pm

Thousands of messages posted on the Internet every day in China get censored. Until now, little has been known about how the Chinese censorship machine works — except that it is comprehensive.

"It probably is the largest effort ever to selectively censor human expression," says Harvard University social scientist Gary King. "They don't censor everything. There are millions of Chinese [who] talk about millions of things. But the effort to prune the Internet of certain kinds of information is unprecedented."

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Shots - Health News
2:28 am
Mon September 9, 2013

From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

We may not see them, but we need them.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:58 pm

Look in the mirror and you won't see your microbiome. But it's there with you from the day you are born. Over time, those bacteria, viruses and fungi multiply until they outnumber your own cells 10 to 1.

As babies, the microbes may teach our immune systems how to fight off bad bugs that make us sick and ignore things that aren't a threat.

We get our first dose of microbes from our mothers, both in the birth canal and in breast milk. Family members tend to have similar microbiomes.

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