Health & Science

Animals
11:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

'Moth-ers' Shine a Light on Nighttime Beauties

Think moths are nothing more than drab, little brown fliers stalking your wool sweaters? The folks behind National Moth Week, happening now, want to change that perception. Rutgers University moth expert Elena Tartaglia describes the diversity of moths and the role that they play in nature, and gives some tips on how to become a "moth-er."

Sports
11:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Phil Mickelson Takes a Swing at Science

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. This next segment is specially dedicated to people for whom midsummer means lush greens, maybe a little sand and hopefully a lot of birdies. We're in the thick of golf season. The U.S. Open wrapped up last month, the British Open last weekend. And in just a few weeks, the PGA Championship begins. Up next, a look at the science of this sport. What sets the pros apart? Stroke mechanics, swing thoughts, physics, psychology?

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Krulwich Wonders...
10:55 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Hot People And Cold Cars; Cold People And Hot Cars

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:26 pm

It's high summer, yes, but blink and soon it will be fall, and trees will turn red, brown, beige, yellow, pale green and gold. But not cars. Cars may be making the Earth warmer, but their colors, I notice, have turned wintry.

Take a look at this chart, put together by DuPont. It's their 2012 Automotive Global Color Popularity Report for the planet.

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All Tech Considered
10:17 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Facebook Triumphs, Chromecast Launches

Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 12:29 pm

Each Friday we round up the big conversations in tech and culture during the week that was. We also revisit the work that appeared on this blog, and highlight what we're reading from our fellow technology writers and observers at other organizations.

ICYMI

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TED Radio Hour
8:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

What's It Take To Become A Polar Explorer?

frogdesignmind

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 12:39 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Ben Saunders' TEDTalk

Explorer Ben Saunders wants you to go outside. Not because it's always pleasant and happy, but because that's where the meat of life is, "the juice that we can suck out of our hours and days." In 2004, Saunders skied solo to the North Pole. Saunders' next outdoor excursion? To try to be the first in the world to walk from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole and back again.

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TED Radio Hour
8:41 am
Fri July 26, 2013

To The Edge

What motivates explorers to venture into the unknown?
TED

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 9:02 am

"Certainly to enter a world of terror, you should not be pushed by someone. You should be called. You should be curious. You should have the heart of an explorer." — Philippe Petit, high-wire artist

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Shots - Health News
1:58 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Don't Blame Your Lousy Night's Sleep On The Moon — Yet

Anton-Marlot iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:10 pm

From madness to seizures, to crime and lack of sleep, people have long blamed the full moon for a range of problems. Research, on the other hand, has found little evidence over the years to support these anecdotal accounts of the moon's powers over the human body and brain.

But scientists in Switzerland decided to look again at one of those putative effects — disturbed sleep — and were surprised to see there might be something to the claim after all.

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Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Why Mosquitoes Love Me, And Other Mysteries Revealed

The mosquitoes that feed on people are attracted to over 300 gases and other compounds emitted by human skin.
CDC Public Health Image Library

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 12:44 pm

Come summertime, some of us here at Shots are reminded, as we lounge on decks and venture into overgrown gardens, that we are irresistible to mosquitoes. As we gripe about our itchy, pocked limbs, we can't help but wonder just why they unfailingly devour us and pass over our friends and loved ones. And when it comes to repellent, it's hard to tell just what works best.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

North Carolina Set To Compensate Forced Sterilization Victims

Sterilization victim Lela Dunston, 63 (seated front), following a meeting of the Governor's Eugenics Compensation Task Force in North Carolina in 2012.
Karen Tam AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:31 pm

North Carolina could become the first state to compensate people who were forcibly sterilized in programs across the country that began during the Great Depression and continued for decades, targeting individuals deemed feeble-minded or otherwise unfit.

In a proposed budget, lawmakers have set aside $10 million for one-time payments to an estimated 1,500 people still alive who were part of a state program that sterilized 7,600 men, women and children from 1929 to 1974. The amount of each payout would be determined by how many people came forward.

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Science
4:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

If You Want A Doughnut Hole, Don't Ask A Mathematician

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 10:27 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

A program such as ours is timed to the exact second, and occasionally, there are small holes when our mix of news and features doesn't quite fill up our two-hour slot.

So NPR's Joe Palca offered to come to our rescue with some short math and sciencey hole-filling stories, stories about what else - holes.

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