Politics & Government

Political news

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Donald Trump is in Florida today where once again he is making unbelievable claims. Sam Sanders has been with the Trump campaign for the last couple days and joins us now. Hi, Sam.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has released a second list of economic advisers in less than a week, and this time the names are almost all women.

The advisers include several longtime GOP fundraisers, including Diane Hendricks, co-founder and chairman of ABC Supply in Wisconsin, who was called "America's richest self-made woman" by Forbes magazine.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump announced members of his economic advisory team on Thursday, and they include Wisconsin businesswomen Diane Hendricks and Elizabeth Uihlein. Hendricks is the co-founder and chair of ABC Supply Co., a roofing supply firm, while Uihlein is president of Uline Corp., based in Pleasant Prairie.

The question is repeated in one form or another millions of times a day in social media and random conversation. It comes primarily from the backers of Donald Trump, but also from others — including the simply curious:

Why are the media obsessed with Trump's controversies and not Clinton's?

Editor's note: NPR fact-checked Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's economic speech on Monday.

Trump delivered an address Monday to the Detroit Economic Club, outlining a plan to cut taxes and get rid of regulations. Today was Hillary Clinton's turn, where she argued that her plan would boost the middle class while Trump's plan "would give trillions in tax cuts to big corporations, millionaires, and Wall Street money managers."

Updated at 11:49 a.m. to include reaction from Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Hillary Clinton's campaign.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump declined multiple opportunities to walk back his latest charge that President Obama founded the radical Islamic State terrorist organization.

In interviews Thursday morning with CNBC and the Hugh Hewitt Show, Trump said he did not regret the charge.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

S Bence

Many Milwaukee County residents who attended a hearing Wednesday night at the Washington Park Senior Center don't like the thought of having to pay to park along the lakefront or a wheel tax, in order to help plug a $56 million budget shortfall.

For long-time Republican Matthew Higgins, the moment of truth came when his nine-year-old son came to him with a question.

"'So daddy, is this how the political process works?'" said Higgins, recalling his son's query one evening. "'If you're a member of the Republican Party, does that mean you have to vote Republican, even if you don't agree with what the Republican is saying?'"

Higgins is CEO of a company called RSE Ventures, but he was press secretary when Rudy Giuliani was mayor of New York and was involved with fundraising for the McCain and Romney campaigns.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton now leads Donald Trump by a 10-point margin among registered voters in Wisconsin and by 15 points among likely voters, according to the latest Marquette Law School Poll released Wednesday.

A month ago, Clinton held  a 6-point lead among registered voters here and a 4-point advantage among likely voters.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages