Politics & Government

News
3:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Military Sexual Assault Bill Would Reassign Authority

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speaks to reporters Tuesday. With her Sens. Rand Paul, R-Ky., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Barbara Boxer, D-Calif. and Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, all of whom have endorsed her bill on military sexual assault.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 4:58 pm

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., is fighting for her bill to curb sexual assaults in the military. Her measure would give independent military prosecutors, rather than commanders, the power to decide which cases should be tried in military court.

Military leaders fiercely oppose moving that authority outside the chain of command, arguing that commanders are responsible for the health and welfare of their soldiers. Removing their authority would undermine their ability to lead, they say.

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Japan's Ruling Coalition Wins Control Of Upper House

Japanese Prime Minister and ruling Liberal Democratic Party leader Shinzo Abe delivers a campaign speech in Tokyo ahead of Sunday's polling.
Toshifumi Kitamura AFP/Getty Images

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling coalition has won a decisive election victory, extending its control to the upper house of parliament and setting the stage for the country's first stable government in years.

Based on exit polls, national broadcaster NHK predicts that Abe's Liberal Democratic Party and its coalition partner, New Komeito, will take 71 seats, giving them a total of 130 seats, eight more than needed for a majority in the chamber.

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News
6:44 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Author: Obama's Personal Take On Race Made Impact

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Another American who listened intently to President Obama's remarks Friday was linguist and commentator John McWhorter. He's written several books about race in America, including "Authentically Black: Essays for the Black Silent Majority." McWhorter says Mr. Obama's emphasis on the police and criminal justice hit an essential problem of black inequality in America.

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Code Switch
4:56 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Black Americans Welcome Obama's Entry To Race Discussion

A man holds up a sign at the "Justice for Trayvon" rally in downtown Chicago on Saturday.
Scott Eisen AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 11:41 am

As soon as he made his remarks on race Friday, President Obama was part of an intense conversation around the nation.

In dozens of cities across the country on Saturday, protesters held coordinated rallies and vigils over the not-guilty verdict in the shooting death of unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. Many African-Americans insist that understanding the context for black distress over the Zimmerman verdict is key to honest discussions about race.

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Politics
5:03 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

Return To Iowa

Cyclists pass a grain elevator in The Des Moines Register's annual bike ride across Iowa in 2011. NPR correspondents are joining the ride this year and documenting the journey.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 5:19 pm

Join three NPR reporters as they explore the Iowa they didn't see on the presidential trail.

Don Gonyea, Scott Horsley and Brian Naylor will tour the state by bike this time around, as part of The Des Moines Register's 41st Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa, better known as RAGBRAI.

Follow their travels!

Politics
4:34 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

The Week In News: Obama Enters Trayvon Martin Discussion

On Friday, President Obama spoke from the White House press briefing room about how George Zimmerman's acquittal is being seen through the lens of the African-American experience. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about how unusual that moment was for a sitting U.S. president.

Governing
4:34 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

Examining The Foundation Of 'Stand Your Ground' Laws

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

As we just heard, the president pointedly addressed the self-defense law known as Stand Your Ground.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: If Trayvon Martin was of age and armed, could he have stood his ground on that sidewalk?

LYDEN: And that's our cover story today: Where we stand on Stand Your Ground?

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Politics
4:34 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

Obama's Remarks On Trayvon Reflect Everyday Struggle

Since the acquittal of George Zimmerman on July 13 for the murder of Trayvon Martin, protesters around the country have been chanting, "No justice no peace," and carrying signs that say, "I am Trayvon Martin." On Friday, the president made a surprise appearance in the White House press briefing room and said Trayvon could have been him 35 years ago.

NPR Story
10:40 am
Sat July 20, 2013

Veteran Journalist Helen Thomas Leaves An Outspoken Legacy

Veteran White House correspondent Helen Thomas broke barriers and became a White House fixture, but her famous bluntness caused her downfall in the end.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 2:09 pm

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Politics
6:03 am
Sat July 20, 2013

Detroit's Comeback Story Proved Too Good To Be True

Former Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer, right, and former Gov. John Engler shake hands with Marian and Mike Ilitch during groundbreaking ceremonies at the site of the new Tigers stadium in Oct. 1997. At the time, Archer and Detroit were basking in favorable news coverage.
CARLOS OSORIO AP

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 6:16 pm

Detroit was supposed to be a showplace of the urban renaissance.

A little more than a decade ago, Detroit was widely touted as one of the great comeback stories in the country. It was a common theme in the mid-to-late-1990s, with a generation of successful mayors leading their cities back from the brink — which, in cases such as New York, Philadelphia and Cleveland, included near-collapses into bankruptcy.

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