Politics & Government

Political news

Updated at 6:00 a.m.

President Obama announced Monday that the U.S. will send up to 250 additional military personnel to Syria. The announcement signals a significant expansion of the American military presence in the country, from 50 personnel up to 300.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In this year's election cycle, international trade has emerged as a top campaign issue.

So journalists with NPR and several public-radio member stations set out this week to examine trade matters as part of our special election-year series: A Nation Engaged.

The primary elections across five states Tuesday could decide the nominations of both parties.

That's especially true on the Democratic side. (For the Republicans, scroll down.) Bernie Sanders has come a long way, but the Vermont independent is running out of friendly states. Tuesday is no different, as all but one of the contests (Rhode Island) in these Northeast states are closed primaries.

Wine retailer David Trone is pouring $12.4 million of his own money into his campaign for a Maryland congressional district — the most ever from a self-financing House candidate.

Ahead of the Democratic primary on Tuesday for this suburban Washington, D.C., seat, his decision to entirely self-fund his race with such an exorbitant investment is fueling a debate over money in politics and whether bankrolling your campaign — much like a certain GOP presidential front-runner has done — is a positive or a negative.

A Risky, Expensive Investment

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Two Black Lives Matter protesters took to the stage last August during a Bernie Sanders campaign rally in Seattle. As they moved closer and closer to Sanders' podium and mic, at times raising their fists to the crowd, Mara Jacqueline Willaford told Sanders to yield the mic to a fellow protester.

"If you do not listen to her," Willaford said to Sanders, "your event will be shut down right now."

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is waging a campaign at a turning point. The New York primary earlier this week was essentially a must win. And he lost.

He's still campaigning as hard as ever, hopping from state to state talking about a rigged economy and a political system ruled by millionaires and billionaires. But the candidate who started out as an underdog and rose to heights few expected has a math problem.

Sanders needs to win all the remaining contests by a 20-point margin to catch up to Hillary Clinton in pledged delegates.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Two hundred six thousand Virginians will newly have the right to vote this year. That's according to the office of Virginia Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who signed a bill on Friday that would allow felons who had completed their sentences to vote.

President Obama, in London to meet with the British prime minister, joked that he "warmed up" for those meetings this morning playing Prince's "Purple Rain" and "Delirious."

Obama has long been a fan of the musician, who died yesterday at the age of 57.

The president said he is staying at the U.S. ambassador's residence and "it so happens our ambassador has a turntable, and so this morning we played 'Purple Rain' and 'Delirious' just to get warmed up before we left the house for important bilateral meetings like this."

Pages