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As an immigrant, Tenzin Dorjee did everything he was supposed to do and more. Born in Bhutan, Dorjee is a naturalized U.S. citizen who has lived in upstate New York for nine years.

He runs a successful restaurant, as well as an arts festival, in the tiny town of Plattsburgh, near the U.S.-Canadian border.

Over the years, he has been singled out a few times — but nothing like what he experienced the day after the election.

On a night that the national election results had her discouraged, Seattle resident Anne Johnson had at least one ballot measure to celebrate: ST3, which will raise the local sales tax in the Seattle-Tacoma area to help pump $54 billion into expanding the region's rail and bus systems. It passed by a wide margin.

"That is awesome, and we've put a lot of work into that, and I'm excited for the direction that that will take Seattle," says Johnson, who adds that the transit improvements will help people get to their jobs, to school and will have environmental benefits, too.

Over the weekend, a sizable gaggle of the white nationalist "alt-right" convened at a federal building in Washington, D.C., to puff their chests. It was a motley crew, emboldened by the election of Donald Trump, with whom they shared a broad aversion to immigration and contempt for "political correctness." Their views were finally flitting around the mainstream of American politics.

President-elect Donald Trump issued a Thanksgiving address on Wednesday evening, calling for the nation to come together after a bruising, bitter campaign.

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Whether you're counting votes, counting your blessings or counting olives for your martini, tomorrow is a big day.

(SOUNDBITE OF ALBUM, "BEYOND THE PALE")

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The annual turkey pardon is a silly tradition, and President Obama knows it. On Wednesday, before pardoning turkeys named Tater and Tot, Obama summed up his feelings about this particular duty.

"It is my great privilege — well, it's my privilege — actually, let's just say it's my job to grant them clemency this afternoon," Obama said.

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South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley has been selected as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations in President-elect Donald Trump's administration, according to Trump's transition team.

Haley has accepted the position, which requires Senate confirmation.

NPR State Department correspondent Michele Kelemen reports the position was elevated to Cabinet rank by President George W. Bush and that President Barack Obama kept the designation. But Kelemen says the job of U.N. ambassador was not traditionally Cabinet-rank and it's unclear whether Trump will maintain that status.

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