World

Photo by Ashitaka San, Flickr

The eyes of the world remain on Boston in the wake of Monday’s bombings at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The attacks, which killed three, were described by President Obama as an act of terror.

While the incident was not as deadly as the 9/11 attacks, it was a reminder that in a global context, terrorism is a sad and frequent fact of life around the world. It’s one confronted by police forces and government agencies, but also by the United Nations.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Thousands rallied in Washington last week, urging Congress to create a path to citizenship, for undocumented immigrants.

Meanwhile, the U.S. continues to welcome a different set of people from other countries: refugees. They’ve fled their native lands, to escape persecution.

This year, the U.S. government will welcome 70,000 refugees. About 1,000 will head to Wisconsin.

Cardinals selecting new pope
Servizio Fotografico L'Osservatore Romanov via Getty Images

When Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation last month, the news catapulted into headlines worldwide. Media coverage has continued nearly nonstop, as the Catholic Church prepares to select its next leader. Some outlets have almost treated the process as they would a sports tournament – with analysts and even odds on who will emerge as the next pope.

Wednesday morning at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing, Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin questioned Secretary of State Hillary Clinton about the attacks that took place on September 11, 2012 at the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya.

The Port of Milwaukee bid farewell this month, to its final international visitor of the season.

The ship “Federal EMS” deposited a load of steel and then hurried off to other Great Lakes ports – needing to pass through the St. Lawrence Seaway before it closes for winter.

Before the ocean-going vessel departed, I visited Captain, Andrzej Lasota to learn about life at sea.

In 30 years of practicing medicine, Dr. George Risi has never had an experience as emotionally draining as his month in Sierra Leone.

He had cared for Ebola patients. He himself caught the virus. Only then, said Dr. Kent Brantly, did he fully grasp the awful nature of this disease.

University of California Press

Two hundred million rural peasants move to China's booming cities - every year. This seismic shift offers China some major economic advantages in the global economy, and has ramifications for the rest of the world.

Where Does Your Coffee Grow?

Nov 18, 2010

Contributor Chris Hallberg lives in Wauwatosa. He recently returned from a ten-month Fulbright Fellowship in El Salvador where he met up with two Stone Creek employees who were visiting a coffee farm, and produced this audio essay for our Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? series.

Israel's Water Plan

Dec 11, 2009

Eilon Adar is the director of the Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He spoke with Stephanie Lecci from his home in Israel.

Katherine Bliss is a senior fellow of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. She spoke about global water and sanitation issues this fall at the Institute of World Affairs at UW-Milwaukee. You can find her report on US leadership on drinking water and sanitation here.

While sports fan in the U.S. have been focused this week on the Donald Sterling scandal, European soccer fans have been talking about another racial incident. At a match between FC Barcelona (popularly known as Barça) and Villareal CF in Spain this past weekend, Brazilian player Dani Alves was setting up to take a corner kick when a banana, thrown by a fan, landed in front of him on the pitch. (You know, because racist taunts are never subtle.)

Germany is the world's third-largest arms exporter and Sigmar Gabriel, the country's minister for economic affairs, is determined to move his country farther down that list.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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