World

Parallels
12:32 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Youth Interrupted: Myanmar's Underage, Illiterate Workers

A child carries a basket of stones while unloading a quarry boat with adult workers at a port in Yangon, Myanmar, last year. The U.N. says more than a third of the country's children have jobs.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:07 pm

Little King can't read or write. Little King can't tell you the name of his country's president.

But he's sturdy enough to balance heavy, spine-bending bundles of cargo atop his skull. Strong enough to tug dinghies loaded with bananas across the Yangon River's mucky banks at low tide.

Down by the docks, where men work like mules, Little King can earn $3 per day. He is a breadwinner, the primary supporter of a woman he adores and her two children.

But that woman is his mother. Those children are his sisters. Little King is just a kid.

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Parallels
11:06 am
Thu September 19, 2013

France Moves To Say 'Mais Non' To Honey Boo Boos

Proposed legislation in France would ban pageants for the under-16 set, such as this "Mini-Miss" elegance beauty contest for 10-to-12-year-olds, held in Bobigny, near Paris, a year ago.
Benoit Tessier Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:41 pm

The French government has taken a step toward saying non to beauty pageants for girls younger than 16. Earlier this week, the upper house of Parliament voted in favor of banning such contests as part of a larger bill on women's rights.

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Shots - Health News
11:02 am
Thu September 19, 2013

A Hospital Tells Police Where Fights Happen, And Crime Drops

An ambulance makes its way through revelers in Cardiff city center in Wales in 2010. New measures in the city have reduced injuries caused by violence.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 2:25 pm

On Saturday night, the emergency room staff knows all too well what's coming — people showing up with a broken jaw, a knife wound or a bashed-in face, often after too many hours in a pub. Doctors at the emergency department in Cardiff, Wales, realized that many of the people who were injured in fights never reported it to the police. That realization led to a simple program that has radically reduced the toll of violence.

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Parallels
9:09 am
Thu September 19, 2013

An Indian Terrorism Case, With Links To Informal Cash Transfers

An Afghan dealer waits for customers at a money market in Kandahar province, in November 2012. The U.S. has started attacking the Taliban's funding channels ahead of withdrawing most of its forces from Afghanistan by 2014.
Ahmad Nadeem Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:41 pm

Police in India arrested the co-founder of an organization blamed for terrorist attacks across the country. But it was the revelations following the August arrest of Yasin Bhaktal, the alleged head of the Indian Mujahideen, that caught our eye.

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The Two-Way
6:09 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Death Toll At 80 And Likely To Rise As Storms Slam Mexico

Near the town of Petaquillas, Mexico, a man held on to a line Wednesday as he crossed a stream swollen by rain dumped by the storm Manuel.
Alejandrino Gonzalez AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:54 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': Host Renee Montagne talks with the AP's Michael Weissenstein

Mud slides, flash floods and rising waters are proving to be a deadly combination in the mountains near Acapulco, Mexico, where dozens of people have died in recent days as a tropical storm-turned hurricane pummels the area.

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Europe
5:13 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Exhibit In Scotland Showcases Miniature Books

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. There's a teensy tiny exhibit at the National Library of Scotland showcasing miniature books. One of the world's smallest is a version of the nursery rhyme "Old King Cole" no bigger than a grain of rice. Back in the 1800s, one Scottish publisher discovered that a poorly selling copy of poems by Robert Burns became a bestseller when he miniaturized it, starting a tradition there of wee little tomes, not so much read as collected. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Sports
2:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Afghan Soccer Team's Win Fuels National Pride

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Soccer was banned in Afghanistan under the Taliban. Today it's fueling a week-long party. Afghans are over the moon since their national team won the South Asian Football Federation championship last week. It was a stunning victory over India, two to nothing, especially for a team of unpaid players who slept in airports on the way to tournaments because they could not afford hotel rooms.

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Analysis
2:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Feds Say NYC Building Is A Front For Iran

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the last few days we've learned that Iran has released political prisoners and that its new president and President Obama have written each other. Also suggesting a thaw in the relationship, both leaders expressed a desire to resolve their countries' dispute over Iran's nuclear program. These seeming overtures come as President Hassan Rouhani prepares to fly to New York to address the U.N.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Europe
2:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

France Moves To Ban Kids Under 16 From Beauty Pageants

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The French Senate voted to ban beauty pageants for children under 16. The measure is part of a larger bill on women's rights.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that lawmakers see this move as a way to protect the young from being sexualized.

(SOUNDBITE OF A DOCUMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (French spoken)

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Latin America
2:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

More Rain On The Way For Stranded Acapulco Tourists

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An unusual double whammy hit Mexico this week, with hurricanes slamming into both coasts, Ingrid in the east and Manuel in the west. More than 80 people have died amid mudslides and flooding. Some of the worst damage has been along the Pacific coast around the famous resort town of Acapulco, where tens of thousands of tourists have been stranded. And it looks like more rain is on the way.

Associated Press reporter Michael Weissenstein is on the line from Acapulco. Thank you for joining us.

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