World

The Two-Way
9:50 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Australian's Shooting Death Echoes From Oklahoma To Melbourne

A tribute page to Christopher Lane, an Australian college baseball player who was shot and killed in Oklahoma last week, has drawn thousands of responses on Facebook.
Facebook

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:20 pm

The killing of an Australian man who was in the U.S. on a baseball scholarship has brought grief to his hometown and to the small Oklahoma town where he was shot to death. Three teens have been arrested for the crime; one suspect says they simply had nothing better to do, the police report.

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Parallels
7:58 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Samsung Under Fire For Alleged Brazil Labor Violations

A man holds up a Samsung S4 smartphone against a video screen. Samsung is accused of labor violations in Brazil, home to its largest manufacturing operation.
Dado Ruvic Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 8:15 am

We told you recently about new allegations of violations at three Chinese factories that make Apple's popular iPhones and iPads. Now, we have more allegations of labor violations – this time against Apple's main rival, Samsung, and its operations in Brazil.

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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Prince George's First Official Photos Break With Tradition

In a second "first" photo of Prince George, the family's dogs joined in. Tilly, a retriever, is to the Duchess of Cambridge's right. Lupo, a cocker spaniel, is beside the duke.
Michael Middleton PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 10:41 am

For all you royal watchers:

"Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge have bypassed professional photographers and chosen family snapshots for the first official images of their new son, Prince George," as The Associated Press writes.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Murder Charges Against Pakistan's Musharraf Are Unprecedented

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf in April, near his home in Islamabad.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:59 am

The indictment Tuesday of former Pakistani President and army chief Pervez Musharraf on murder charges connected to the 2007 assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto is an unprecedented exercise of power by a civilian court in a country long dominated by the nation's military, NPR's Abdul Sattar reports from Islamabad.

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The Two-Way
6:01 am
Tue August 20, 2013

UPDATE: No Decision Yet On Egyptian Aid, White House Says

Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the constitutional court in Cairo.
Al Youm Elsabaa newspaper EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 1:02 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We put a new top on this post at 11:50 a.m. ET and added a new development being reported by the AP at 2 p.m. ET.)

The Obama administration is still reviewing U.S. assistance to Egypt and it's incorrect to say that such aid has been "secretly" put on hold, the White House said Tuesday.

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Middle East
4:23 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Symbolic Developments Indicate Direction Egypt Is Headed

Egypt's military-backed rulers are pressing on in their crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood. Authorities have arrested the group's spiritual leader. Since the security forces crackdown on Islamist protesters last week, nearly 1,000 people have been killed.

Asia
4:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Pakistan's Former Leader Musharraf Charged In Bhutto's Death

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 4:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. A dramatic turn of events in Pakistan this morning where a court has indicted the country's former military ruler, Pervez Musharraf, in the murder of Benazir Bhutto. Bhutto was an internationally known name and a popular former prime minister of Pakistan who was making a political comeback in 2007 when she was assassinated at a campaign rally.

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History
4:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

English Debate What To Do With Richard III's Remains

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:49 am

More than 500 years after the Wars of the Roses, the English are again fighting over Richard the Third. Archaeologists from the University of Leicester last year unearthed his remains under a parking lot in the city. Leicester Cathedral has earmarked more than a million pounds to give him a proper burial. But not so fast say the people of York.

Europe
5:39 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Relying On Old Artisan Ways, French Brand Makes Itself Anew

Moynat was renowned for products such as the lightweight wicker trunk named Malle Anglaise, or English trunk, which was invented in 1873. This trunk was subsequently improved and a new patent filed in 1889.
Courtesy of Moynat

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:58 pm

Founded in the mid-19th century, French luxury leather goods maker Moynat became renowned for making traveling trunks for the moneyed set. Though a pioneer in its field, it fell on hard times and closed its doors in the 1970s.

These days, the fabled company is undergoing a resurrection — turning out limited quantities of luxurious, handmade bags that rely on centuries-old craftsmanship.

On a recent day, Moynat's CEO, Guillaume Davin, leads me up the back stairs of the company's flagship boutique in Paris.

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Africa
4:13 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Obama Administration Resists Cutting Off Egypt Aid

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:58 pm

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said on Monday that the United States has limited influence in Egypt, where a violent crackdown by Egypt's military has left hundreds of protesters dead. Hagel's comment comes as some in Congress suggest the U.S. does have substantial leverage. They want the the U.S. to cut off military aid to Egypt.

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