Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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Ann-Elise Henzl

Barbara Miner's ears pricked up last week when Mayor Tom Barrett suggested people living in homes built before 1952 install water filters, especially if small children live there. Miner asked: "Really? Why haven't we heard about this before?"

Miner's Riverwest home is among 70,000 with lead laterals. Those are the pipes that connect houses to the city's water mains. As the laterals age, lead can break off and mix with drinking water.

Milwaukee has seen more violence and unrest than usual over the last few weeks. August was the city's deadliest month in a quarter century with 24 homicides. And over one weekend, protesters threw rocks at police, and torched businesses, angry about a fatal police shooting. Yet many people are giving less than rave reviews to a new proposal to boost public safety.

Critics say the plan is out of touch with what the community needs. And City Hall may hear those criticisms again on Thursday.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Wisconsin has had its share this year of visits from Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Thursday night, it was Gary Johnson's turn. The Libertarian presidential hopeful stopped in Milwaukee for a spirited rally.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

In collaboration with NPR for the A Nation Engaged series, public radio stations across the country are asking people this week: What is America's place in the world?

For answers from a Wisconsin perspective, WUWM talked to people involved in agriculture. It's one of the most important sectors of the state economy. Those involved envision its role on the global stage growing.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The new Mexican Consulate in Milwaukee was formally inaugurated this afternoon. Among those taking part were Mexican Foreign Minister Claudia Ruiz Massieu and Gov. Scott Walker.

The consulate, located at 1443 N. Prospect, will provide services for Mexican nationals, such as help in procuring legal documents.

Original story from February 16, 2016:

City of Milwaukee (Department of City Development)

Could jobs be headed to Milwaukee's north side? A local businessman is hopeful, and he’s talking with others.

Tim Sullivan used to lead South Milwaukee giant Bucyrus, a mining manufacturer. Now he's CEO of REV Group, a firm headquartered in Milwaukee, which makes ambulances, buses, street sweepers and a range of other vehicles.

REV Group has bid on a contract with the United States Postal Service to build vans.

Sullivan says the city's north side would be the perfect place to do the work because of the area's huge labor pool.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Summer vacation is drawing to a close for thousands of Milwaukee students. But for some, learning has continued throughout the warm months. They’ve been taking part in YouthBuild program.

The program, run by MATC and Journey House, prepares people ages 16-24, who've dropped out of school for a career in the construction trades.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

At a press conference Monday, Mayor Tom Barrett announced that the existing 10 p.m. weekday curfew for minors will be more strictly enforced.

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke has also ordered Sherman Park to close to the public at 6 p.m. Monday night. It will reopen at 6 a.m. on Tuesday. Clarke announced that the nighttime park closure will continue until further notice. People angry about the fatal police shooting of an African American man in Milwaukee took to the streets again overnight Sunday.

Michelle Maternowski

For updates, follow @WUWMradio on Twitter or this post from Monday.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett and Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn held a news conference Sunday afternoon to share details about the investigation into Saturday's events. Barrett said there is a photo that shows "without a question" that the African American man who was fatally shot by police was holding a gun.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Public Library

This week's Bubbler Talk inquiry comes from listener Brad Lichtenstein: "Besides the lakefront, what else did Socialist mayors do for Milwaukee?"

UW-Milwaukee historian Aims McGuinness met Lichtenstein and WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl at the lakefront custard stand to share the backstory. He says the area was part of a massive public works project, which was completed in 1929.

Over the last few days, we've shared the thoughts of people who experienced the 1960s. How do they think that era's turbulence compares to today’s? In our final installment, we meet a retired professor of history, who watched developments unfold.

Glen Jeansonne is a professor emeritus at UW-Milwaukee. He grew up in a small Louisiana town and was a child in the early 1960s. Jeansonne says he recalls witnessing the struggle for civil rights at the town's pool.

We continue our reports on societal stresses of the 1960s, including political, military and racial upheaval. It made some people uncertain about the nation's future.

Our first story featured the perspective of a white man who was a Milwaukee police officer in the `60s, in the middle of racial unrest. In this report, we ask an African American, Dr. Howard Fuller, director of the Institute for the Transformation of Learning at Marquette University.

Fuller has worn many hats. In the 1960s, he was a frequent protester in North Carolina, where he sometimes tangled with police.

Tensions between the police and community, a deep political divide, and American soldiers deployed in an intractable war. Those descriptors could apply to today. 

But they also define one of the most turbulent decades in recent U.S. history: the 1960s.


The presidential campaign trail heats up again in Wisconsin on Friday. Republican Donald Trump, and his vice presidential pick Mike Pence, are holding a rally in Green Bay. Meanwhile, Democrat Hillary Clinton's running mate, Tim Kaine, will visit Milwaukee.

The last time Wisconsin saw multiple visits from presidential campaigns in a short time period was just before our state's primary in April. It was the only contest in the nation that day, and all the major candidates spent time here. In one of his stops, Donald Trump rallied supporters in Janesville.

Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker took center stage Wednesday night during the prime time session of the Republican National Convention.

Walker spoke for about 10 minutes, outlining why he believes voters should choose GOP nominee Donald Trump for president. Walker also urged people to vote for Republicans in other races.

Here are some highlights of Walker's address: