Ann-Elise Henzl

News Reporter / Executive Director of Project Milwaukee

Ann-Elise Henzl has been a reporter at WUWM since 1993. She got her foot in the door three years earlier, as a newsroom student intern. Ann-Elise divides her time between daily general assignment reporting and working on longer, researched stories. Ann-Elise is also Executive Producer of WUWM's Project Milwaukee series.

Ann-Elise has won numerous awards, including the national Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association (for best use of sound in a story). In addition, she has frequently been recognized for her reporting on the welfare system, the environment, and health care.

Ann-Elise earned English and Mass Communication degrees from UW-Milwaukee.

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Madison Police Dept.

The Madison Police Department has released its review on Officer Matt Kenny’s fatal shooting of Tony Robinson.

The internal investigation determined that Kenny did not violate the department’s policies, regarding use of deadly force.

Kenny shot Robinson to death in March, after Robinson hit the officer on the head. Reports say the 19-year-old Robinson was on drugs at the time. He was not armed.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Ann Althouse, Flickr

The spotlight at the state Capitol was not on the next state budget Tuesday, but rather on abortion.

Legislators listened to hours of testimony on a fast-tracked abortion bill. It would ban the procedure, in almost all cases, after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Any doctors who violate the law could be charged with a felony and sent to prison.


Dozens of faith leaders in Wisconsin are outraged with the Legislature’s Joint Committee on Finance. It decided to increase prison spending in the next state budget by $5 million, in order to add capacity.


Wisconsin lawmakers sink their teeth this week into some of the more divisive portions of Gov. Scott Walker’s biennial budget. One is how to pay for transportation.

Walker doesn’t want to raise taxes to pay for the state’s transportation needs. So one tool he uses is bonding. His transportation secretary Mark Gottlieb had recommended a hike in the gas tax. But Gottlieb found himself pitching Walker’s plan to the Legislature’s joint finance committee.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Milwaukee’s homicide rate far exceeds last year’s at this time. Outbursts of violence have punched several neighborhoods particularly hard.

Last weekend, for instance, bullets struck five people who had gathered to mourn the killing of a teen. The COA Goldin Center at 23rd and Burleigh is about one-half mile away from the quintuple shooting.

At the end of the school day, the center’s basketball courts are packed. So is a table where high schoolers are playing chess. The scene in the Amani neighborhood appears picture-perfect. Quan Caston can’t say the same about the area.

The outcome of next year’s battle between former senator Russ Feingold and incumbent Ron Johnson could determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

The contest will be a rematch of 2010, when Johnson ousted Feingold.

Wisconsin first sent Feingold to the Senate in 1992. The Democrat was perhaps best known for shepherding through bipartisan campaign finance reform, and casting the lone “no” vote against the Patriot Act, after the 9-11 attacks.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A lab at UW-Milwaukee began creating 3D-printed hands after a girl asked for one for Christmas.

The girl is Shea Stollenwerk of Mukwonago, who’s now in fourth grade. She was born with one fully-formed hand, and one with no fingers.

Shea’s mom Ranee says Shea learned to do just about everything, without wanting an artificial hand. Then she changed her mind about a year and a half ago, after discovering a YouTube video of a boy using a 3D printed prosthetic hand.


It appeared on Tuesday that Milwaukee’s Common Council would reduce the fine for marijuana possession.

Currently, the fine for possessing up to 25 grams is from $250 to $500. Ald. Nik Kovac wants to lower the penalty to from $0 to $50.

Kovac says the fine is unfair to black residents.

“Out of about 1,500 tickets last year, 1,250 were issued to African Americans, in a city that has approximately the same number of African Americans as whites,” Kovac says.

pingu2004, fotolia

State lawmakers are considering whether to scrap the prevailing wage law. It requires government to hire workers for certain public projects at a wage that reflects the industry standard.

Lawmakers wrapped up a lengthy Senate committee debate on Tuesday, without acting on the divisive proposal.

Wauwatosa Republican state Sen. Leah Vukmir tried to convince colleagues to repeal the law.

She calls the prevailing wage “anti-competitive” and “anti-free market,” and says after some 80 years on the books, it’s time for change.

Omar Havana/Getty Images

The devastating earthquake in Nepal has shaken the local Nepali community.

Tilak KC says he and other natives of Nepal, who now call the Milwaukee area home, learned of the weekend earthquake in the middle of the night here. Information was scarce at first, but eventually trickled in. He finally heard on Monday that his brother was alive.

Parashu Giri says the community continues to pay close attention to the news. He’s concerned the number of lives lost will rise, as rescue efforts spread to rural areas.