Arthur Cyr

Foreign Policy Contributor

Arthur I. Cyr is Director of the Clausen Center for World Business and Clausen Distinguished Professor at Carthage College in Kenosha. Previously he was President of the Chicago World Trade Center, the Vice President of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, a faculty member and executive at UCLA, and an executive at the Ford Foundation. His publications include the book After the Cold War - American Foreign Policy, Europe and Asia (Macmillan and NYU Press).

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Almost three weeks have passed since the Presidential election. News analysts and regular people alike are still trying to assess what transpired on November 8th.

Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says contrary to much public opinion, there was some precedent for the way the electorate swung:

“We have met the enemy and he is us.” The ironic statement is from the durable comic strip “Pogo” by cartoonist Walt Kelly, widely syndicated in newspapers from the late 1940s into the 1970’s.

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The names are flying fast and furious around the transition team for the incoming Trump administration. The team itself has seen names come and go already, and potential cabinet picks are being vetted both privately and in the media.

Foreign affairs under a Donald Trump presidency make for intriguing storylines, many of which are on the radar of our foreign policy contributor, Art Cyr.

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Developments in this year’s presidential race continue at breakneck pace.

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When North Korea reportedly tested a nuclear weapon late last week it was, literally, an earth shaking event. Seismologists in the United States were able to detect the manmade earthquake from the blast.

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The historic decision by Britain to leave the European Union has left the world shocked and perplexed. Protests are widespread, a search for a new leader has begun following David Cameron's resignation, and parallels to the United States are hard to ignore. 

"The breaking up of two-party dominance in Britain is quite profound and contrasts with our ability, for better or for worse, to keep a two-party system in place," says Art Cyr, Lake Effect foreign policy contributor. 

United States Coast Guard

Seventy-two years ago today, Allied forces stormed the beaches at Normandy. It was one of the largest amphibious invasions in military history – known as D-Day. It was the turning point in the European theater, and led to the end of World War II. Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says it’s worth taking a few minutes out of our busy lives to remember that day.

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Despite the American Revolution and the War of 1812, the governments of the United States and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland enjoy what is termed a special relationship. Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says that diplomatic closeness is a good thing:

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Primary voters in five more states brought the primary season closer to its conclusion yesterday.  Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are still the most likely nominees of their parties for the presidency. 

The popularity of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump this spring is an indication that retail politics are still important, according to contributor Art Cyr.

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In 2013, 5 exabytes of data were created every day. That’s five billion gigabytes each day. To put that in context, 5 exabytes of content were created between the birth of the world and 2003.

In 2016 it’s safe to say there is even more information created daily and then stored in data clouds around the world, and there’s no end in sight. And as essayist Art Cyr reminds us, the battle over who has access to all that information is still being fought:

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It’s been a violent week in several parts of the world. Even amid signs of a de-escalation in Syria, a terrorist incident rocked the African nation of Ivory Coast. Another terror bombing in Turkey raised fears about instability in that vital western ally.

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Pope Francis was in Mexico this week talking about borders and immigration policy while the presidential candidates did the same on this side of the border.

In addition, this week the White House also announced that President Obama will soon become the first American President since Calvin Coolidge to visit Cuba.

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Does it feel to you like all the international news comes with a side order of doom and gloom?  Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says there are reasons to keep our collective chin up:

“Nattering nabobs of negativism,” is probably the most enduring of the many alliterative pronouncements of Spiro Agnew, Vice President in the Nixon administration until forced to resign because of corruption. This particular phrase, penned by Nixon speechwriter William Safire, derogatively denigrated diligent reporters for placing bad news above good.

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Before the first of the year, we spent plenty of time looking back at developments in a variety of areas over the past 12 months. 

However, our foreign policy contributor joins us to look ahead at potential events to expect in other parts of the world and how it relates to the United States:

*One thing foreign policy contributor Art Cyr did not anticipate was the apparent test of a nuclear weapon by North Korea – and so we note that the interview was recorded before that particular event took place. 

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Controversy continues to swirl around Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s call to ban Muslims from entering the United States in the wake of the violence in Paris and in Southern California.  

Some GOP leaders, such as House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, have condemned Trump’s idea. But Ryan and others have stopped short of saying the comments should disqualify Trump from holding the highest office in the country.

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November brings Veterans Day, and also this year the fiftieth anniversary of the major battle in the Ia Drang Valley of Vietnam involving the U.S. Army 1st Cavalry Division. Casualty rates on both sides made this one of the costliest battles of that long war, and ironically reinforced the strategies of both Hanoi and Washington.

A decade later in 1975, Hanoi's overall approach was confirmed when North Vietnamese regulars overran the capital of South Vietnam, now Ho Chi Minh City, as the few remaining Americans evacuated.

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