Arthur Cyr

Foreign Policy Contributor

Arthur I. Cyr is Director of the Clausen Center for World Business and Clausen Distinguished Professor at Carthage College in Kenosha. Previously he was President of the Chicago World Trade Center, the Vice President of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, a faculty member and executive at UCLA, and an executive at the Ford Foundation. His publications include the book After the Cold War - American Foreign Policy, Europe and Asia (Macmillan and NYU Press).

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In South Korea former president and conservative politician, Park Geun-hye, was impeached this year for abuse of power. The process to find Park's replacement culminated in the election of current president, Moon Jae-in of the Democratic Party of Korea. He won in a landslide. Lake Effect essayist, Art Cyr, has been reflecting on the recent election and what it means for the state of democracy. 

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Developments in Washington have been coming at a breakneck pace in recent weeks, from the firing of FBI director James Comey to the changing explanations for it, to allegations that President Trump shared classified intelligence with Russian diplomats, to the appointment of a Justice Department special counsel to continue the probe into Russian influence in US electoral politics.

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This week, US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson traveled to Russia. His mission was to convince the Putin administration to back off from its support of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who is accused of using poison gas on his own citizens as that country’s civil war continues.

Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says those accusations greatly escalate the stakes in Syria:

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The Trump Administration is continuing to try to manage the first major foreign policy crisis of its term: the deteriorating situation in Syria. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson traveled to Russia this week to try to pressure that country to back off its support for the Assad regime in the wake of poison gas it used in the country’s ongoing civil war.

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Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis was recently confirmed as Secretary of Defense. Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says Mattis’ military background is a plus in his new job.

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Forget the first hundred days. The first hundred hours of the Trump Administration are without parallel in recent memory. From immigration policy to trade, our place in the modern world seems to be evolving rather quickly.

One thing that hasn’t changed is the analytical eye of our foreign policy contributor. The always level-headed Art Cyr joins Lake Effect to chat.

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Almost three weeks have passed since the Presidential election. News analysts and regular people alike are still trying to assess what transpired on November 8th.

Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says contrary to much public opinion, there was some precedent for the way the electorate swung:

“We have met the enemy and he is us.” The ironic statement is from the durable comic strip “Pogo” by cartoonist Walt Kelly, widely syndicated in newspapers from the late 1940s into the 1970’s.

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The names are flying fast and furious around the transition team for the incoming Trump administration. The team itself has seen names come and go already, and potential cabinet picks are being vetted both privately and in the media.

Foreign affairs under a Donald Trump presidency make for intriguing storylines, many of which are on the radar of our foreign policy contributor, Art Cyr.

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Developments in this year’s presidential race continue at breakneck pace.

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When North Korea reportedly tested a nuclear weapon late last week it was, literally, an earth shaking event. Seismologists in the United States were able to detect the manmade earthquake from the blast.

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The historic decision by Britain to leave the European Union has left the world shocked and perplexed. Protests are widespread, a search for a new leader has begun following David Cameron's resignation, and parallels to the United States are hard to ignore. 

"The breaking up of two-party dominance in Britain is quite profound and contrasts with our ability, for better or for worse, to keep a two-party system in place," says Art Cyr, Lake Effect foreign policy contributor. 

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Seventy-two years ago today, Allied forces stormed the beaches at Normandy. It was one of the largest amphibious invasions in military history – known as D-Day. It was the turning point in the European theater, and led to the end of World War II. Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says it’s worth taking a few minutes out of our busy lives to remember that day.

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Despite the American Revolution and the War of 1812, the governments of the United States and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland enjoy what is termed a special relationship. Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says that diplomatic closeness is a good thing:

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Primary voters in five more states brought the primary season closer to its conclusion yesterday.  Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are still the most likely nominees of their parties for the presidency. 

The popularity of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump this spring is an indication that retail politics are still important, according to contributor Art Cyr.

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In 2013, 5 exabytes of data were created every day. That’s five billion gigabytes each day. To put that in context, 5 exabytes of content were created between the birth of the world and 2003.

In 2016 it’s safe to say there is even more information created daily and then stored in data clouds around the world, and there’s no end in sight. And as essayist Art Cyr reminds us, the battle over who has access to all that information is still being fought:

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