Audrey Nowakowski

Lake Effect Producer

Audrey is a producer for Lake Effect. She is involved with every aspect of the show - from conducting interviews to editing audio to posting web stories and mixing the show together.

Her regular segments include Fit For You and film discussions. Before becoming a full-time producer, Audrey interned for Lake Effect starting in 2014 and joined the team full-time in the spring of 2015.

Audrey is a graduate of Cardinal Stritch University where she majored in Communication Arts and minored in History and English. She has also worked with 91.7 WMSE producing public service announcements.

Ways to Connect

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Photo courtesy of Larry Gnatzig

Lake Effect recently covered the opening of the Inclusion Clinic by Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin – the area’s first primary and preventive care clinic for the LGBTQ community. On the other end of the care spectrum is navigating the local, state, and federal aid systems you might need when you or your partner faces a disability later in life.

yavdat / Fotolia

There are more than 100 specialties in the field of medicine. However, few providers and clinics focus their care on the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning/queer) community.

Miramax

Milwaukee's Francophiles can begin celebrating Bastille Days early this year at the Avalon Theater with a screening of Jean-Pierre Jeunet's 2001 film Amélie on Wednesday, July 11th. "France has nurtured one of the world's most significant movie industries," says film critic Dave Luhrssen. "The country can lay claim to having invented motion pictures. It was the sight of the first commercial screening of a movie."

This weekend on Lake Effect:

We’ve all heard the apocryphal George Washington cherry tree story, but on today’s show writer and Wisconsin native Peter Stark tells the tales of the real young George Washington. Film contributor Dave Luhrssen reflects on why a soft-spoken and gentle man in a zip up cardigan playing with puppets - and the documentary about him - has touched so many people. Plus we have the latest edition of our storytelling series, Ex Fabula.

Guests:

Wisco Pop!

As we prepare for the 4th of July holiday, I’m sure you have a lot of items on your grocery list for the picnics and familycook outs to come. One thing you need to have on a hot summer day is a cooler full of beverages - water, beer, soda (or pop if you prefer).

Soda has been around since the 1800s, and is probably something we take for granted today. But when was the last time you actually thought about how your soda was made?

Milwaukee musician Joe Richter’s early work includes time with some area cover bands and his own acoustic songs.  But his latest release, Revival is his first produced album with a full band behind him - a goal he's had since he first started composing and performing. 

"It's hard to image actually all of these songs as an acoustic piece," notes Richter. "I really wanted to go away from that on this record... I wanted to branch out, I'm really proud we decided to do it this way."

Audrey Nowakowski

If you live, work, or drive through downtown Milwaukee, chances are your route has been interrupted by the sound of a dinging bell and the bellow of a horn as a bridge prepares to allow a boat pass.

After all, Milwaukee is home to 21 movable bridges, which cross the Menomonee, Kinnickinnic, and Milwaukee rivers.

Africa Studio / Fotolia

The recent deaths of food writer and host Anthony Bourdain and designer Kate Spade have cast the issue of suicide into the public eye. But while those high-profile cases generated headlines, suicide has been a significant public health issue for years.

Universal Pictures

It’s been 25 years since movie audiences first saw awe-inspiring dinosaurs come to life in Steven Spielberg’s classic film – Jurassic Park. Yet, five films (and possibly counting) later, studios are still making movies about the inevitable bad situations that will happen when large, once extinct dangerous creators are brought back to life.

Audrey Nowakowski

Bikes have had many forms since they were invented, from the classic two-wheeled bicycle, to tricycles, unicycles, fixed gear bikes, fat tire bikes… the list goes on.

But it’s still rare to see a handcycle on the streets of Milwaukee. The three-wheeled, seven-foot-long machine is arm-powered, and most commonly used by disabled athletes. While an athlete’s body operates a handcycle differently, handcycle races are just as exhilarating as any other form of bike racing.

Photo courtesy of Lindsey Kriete

Many cyclists would agree that training for the sport can be labor-intensive and time-consuming. Milwaukee cyclist Lindsey Kriete manages to balance rigorous cycling training alongside working a full-time job. Her next races will be alongside nearly 500 other cyclists during the Tour of America’s Dairyland.

Focus Features

If you grew up watching public television, the sound of a piano's ascending chords and the ding of a trolley bell may take you back to the land of "Make Believe" and into the television home of Fred Rogers. Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood began in 1968 and continuously aired first-run shows for more than 30 years.

You wouldn’t expect that a program with a soft-spoken and gentle man in a zip up cardigan playing with puppets would have touched so many people, but generations came to know Mr. Rogers as an essential part of their lives, early education, and childhood.

Harper Collins Publishers

June marked the one-year anniversary of the shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida. Many religious leaders and laypeople alike came together in the wake of the shooting to provide support, and mourn the loss of the victims killed in the LGBT nightclub.

Xeno Books

If you’re a parent, you’ll probably never forget how you felt the first time you found out you were expecting. Becoming a parent changes everything, and fear and love can be constant companions. As Father’s Day approaches, we look at one man who processed his feelings about fatherhood in his own unique way.

Audrey Nowakowski

Parkinson’s Disease is a degenerative neurological condition that causes patients to lose muscle and body control over time.  It can start out as something as simple as a limp, progress to tremors, and can eventually leave a patient entirely incapacitated.

While doctors and hospitals can offer medications, surgery, and physical therapy - some people diagnosed with the disease look for a supportive group environment with others who see Parkinson’s as just one part of their lives. 

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