Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Kevin J. Miyazaki / PLATE

With our Brewers baseball team and a nickname paying homage to the city’s alcohol-fueled history, it should come as no surprise that Milwaukee is a big drinking town. So when the staff of Milwaukee Magazine sat down to hammer out their ultimate guide to drinking in the city, there were more than a few contentious categories.

Syda Productions / Fotolia

As the holiday season gets underway, there are a myriad of new productions opening at theaters throughout Milwaukee. Lake Effect contributor and local theater critic Dave Begel, regularly joins us to talk about shows on stage around Wisconsin and some of the big topics impacting theater around the world. Begel offers his opinions on the latest round of theater openings and the must-see productions this season. 

Screenshot from Facebook

If the opioid epidemic is a suburban problem, someone forgot to tell Gidget DeLaTorre, 51. She’s lost two close friends to overdoses in the past 10 months and her son sits in prison, after his life spun out of control due to an opioid addiction. All of them grew up on Milwaukee’s South Side.

© European Union 2015 - European Parliament / Flickr

With daily allegations of sexual misconduct or assault being made against men in powerful positions, there is also a growing conversation about how these men have affected women in the workforce. Women have described environments where powerful men were shielded from their accusers, while victims were often shamed and bullied into leaving their jobs.

Skye D. / Flickr

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. But your odds of dying from the disease vary greatly based on your race and ethnicity. African-American women in the United States are more likely to have aggressive forms of breast cancer - and less likely to catch the disease in an early stage.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office / Flickr

When journalist Maziar Bahari went to his home country Iran in 2009, he had no idea what was in store for him. As protests mounted in opposition to the re-election of then President Mahmoud Ahmadinijad, Bahari was imprisoned by the Iranian Government - simply for doing his job.

Courtesy of the ACLU of Wisconsin

When Faiz Shakir joined the American Civil Liberties Union this past January, the organization was still preparing for the inauguration of Donald Trump. Months prior to Shakir’s arrival, the ACLU released a letter addressed to Trump, threatening to sue him if he acted on several of his campaign promises.

He did, and they did. Since his first week in office, the ACLU has been fighting the Trump Administration in court. But in conjunction with these legal battles, the ACLU has been working to build up its political arm in Washington and around the country.

Jeramey Jannene / Flickr

Cities around the country are facing an affordable housing crisis and Milwaukee is no different. That's one of the reasons this year's Henry W. Maier State of Milwaukee Summit at UWM is focusing on the city's on-going issues with housing. 

This year's topic also pays tribute to the 50th anniversary of the March on Milwaukee and the fight for fair housing in the city. 

Elelicht / Wikimedia

Since July, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has been reporting on a series of stories about tourists at Mexican resorts who have experienced mysterious blackouts, resulting in robbery, assault, rape, and death. The culprit? Tainted alcohol - though exactly how it was tainted is another question.

David Banks/Getty Images

Certainly, Wisconsin and Illinois have storied rivalries in the sports arena: the Green Bay Packers vs. the Chicago Bears, the Brewers and the Cubs, the Bucks and the Bulls. But a few of our listeners have been wondering if that competitive spirit runs deeper than the action on the field.

One such listener, Jason Gessner, reached out to Bubbler Talk and asked, “Have Wisconsin and Illinois always had contentious relationship or is that a more modern development?”

Dave Nakayama / Flickr

Right now, there are more than two million people incarcerated in the United States - but that’s just a small fraction of people with a criminal record.

More than 75 million people living in the United States have been convicted of some kind of crime, most of whom spend the majority of their lives in free society. But just because they served their sentence, that doesn’t mean they’re free from consequences associated with their conviction.

Joy Powers

Skipper’s Alley has found a following in places far from their home in Dublin. The Irish band has played on cruise ships, on a St. Patrick’s Day tour in the African nation of Zambia, and now the group is bringing their music to Milwaukee with a performance at the Irish Cultural and Heritage Center

Skipper's Alley describes itself as a "modern Irish folk band with an old-school approach," and their music falls within the traditional Irish music genre - more generally. 

Courtesy of Paul Walter

It’s listener suggestions that inspire the features that make up our weekly Bubbler Talk segment. But Bubbler Talk itself was the inspiration for a student project that played out earlier this year in the community of Slinger.

NASA/COBE Science Team / Wikimedia

John Mather shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2006 for his work with the Cosmic Background Explorer, or COBE. Launched in 1989, the satellite was instrumental in developing our understanding of cosmic microwave background radiation.

So, what is that? 

"The cosmic background is the sort of light and heat that come to us from all directions, way out there from the distant universe. So not coming from objects, but from whatever is really, way farther beyond that," Mather explains. 

seregraff / Fotolia

Most people who interact with cats on a regular basis have had at least a few perplexing moments with them. Human beings look at cats as fairly inscrutable animals, but cat behaviorist Jackson Galaxy would argue that a lot of that confusion comes from what he terms “looking at cats through dog colored glasses.”

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