Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for The Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

She just moved to Milwaukee’s East Side, where she lives with her cats Misses and Marvin. Joy spends much of her free time drawing, painting and practicing the mandolin.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

This weekend on Lake Effect:

Writer Lisa Servon explores why the United States is seeing the rise of alternative financial services and the decline in banks. Then, singer-songwriter Julien Baker performs at the Pabst next week. In our interview with her from last summer, she talks about the push and pull of being a deeply spiritual person in a secular music world. Plus we have the latest episode of our storytelling series Ex Fabula.

Guests:

Earlier this week, Milwaukee Magazine and Lake Effect kicked off a new, monthly live conversation series. This month’s MilMag Live! event focused on two topics. The first of those was the influence of insiders and outsiders in shaping Milwaukee.

The discussion was led by Lake Effect's Mitch Teich and Carole Nicksin from Milwaukee Magazine. One of the areas of richest discussion was what brings people to Milwaukee, and what drives them away. 

The panel included: 

Joy Powers

If you’ve ever walked around the city, you might have noticed the distinctive tiles adorning some of the older homes in town. They’re small, white ceramic with a black font, and they’re fairly standard.

Listener Dan Osterud wrote to Bubbler Talk to ask about how these numbers came to be. 

He wondered: Why are all the house numbers in the city of Milwaukee the same, all one style of ceramic tile? Was this type of number required by law?

Syda Productions / Fotolia

A visit to the doctor’s office can sometimes be an uncomfortable experience - both physically and psychologically. 

Brian Smith/U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Northeast Region / American Bird Conservancy/Flickr

“Bird-friendly” coffee might sound like coffee brewed and developed for our feathered friends, but it’s actually a certification for what is more commonly referred to as shade grown coffee. It’s coffee grown using agroforestry, which encourages more biodiversity, including a variety of trees, small mammals and birds.

iconimage / Fotolia

Every time you post to Twitter or Facebook, these sites are collecting data about you. At this point you ought to expect that by participating in social media sites, you’re giving up some of your privacy. It’s just the name of the game.

Some see big data from social media sites as a god send for researchers - a perfect way to study social habits with huge numbers of people. But what happens when that data with your personal details still attached is published for a study, for the world to see?

WIDOCC

In the wee hours of the morning on July 1, 2015, Valencia Laws decided it was time to take a walk around Wilson Park. Her water had broken the night before and after eight hours of contractions she set off, accompanied by her husband and her doula, DeAnna Tharpe.

“There were people walking their dogs and I would have a contraction and have to stop,” she said. “They would be looking at me like ‘I don’t know if she’s supposed to be here.’”

But with Tharpe by her side, Laws knew she was exactly where she needed to be.

Kirsten Johnson has spent a quarter of a century standing behind a camera. As a cinematographer she has traveled around the world, meeting people and hearing their stories, while creating images of their lives. Her new documentary, Cameraperson, puts those images into a different perspective.

Ken Hanson

There is a growing cultural conversation about gender identity in the United States. Shows like TransparentOrange is the New Black, and I Am Cait have all put transgender issues in the spotlight, and explored what it really means to be trans or gender nonconforming. But these concepts of gender diversity and identity weren't really talked about until recently.  

Free for Commercial Use / Flickr

Anyone who has ventured into a third wave coffee shop like Stone Creek or Colectivo, can tell you: There’s a million ways to brew a cup of coffee. There’s the french press, the moka pot, those ever-popular pour overs - the list goes on and on.

vetre / Fotolia

Until recently, scientists didn't understand just how critical adolescence is for human development. And over the next decade, we will likely learn more than ever before about how young minds develop.

That’s because work is starting on a groundbreaking study of the subject. It's called the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development, or ABCD, Study, and nearly two dozen institutions across the U.S. will be participating in the research.

This conversation originally aired November 11, 2016.

Like many mystery novel protagonists before her, if you come in contact with the character Chloe Ellefson, there's a good chance that someone is going to end up dead. 

BestForYou / Fotolia

The holidays are often a time for giving and receiving long-awaited gifts. How many times has a plea for something new ended with, “Well, if you’re good, maybe Santa will bring it?” So it’s no wonder that many teens are hoping December will bring a new cell phone, table, or even a gaming system. But as the capabilities of these devices has increased, so too has the need to set some boundaries around these connected gadgets.

denisismagilov / Fotolia

When the 21st Century Cures Act was signed by President Obama earlier this week, many praised the bill as a tribute to bipartisanship. The act passed with overwhelming support in the Senate, and was dedicated to Joe Biden’s son, Beau, who died last year from brain cancer.

Although the act earmarks funds for the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot and BRAIN initiatives, the act is more than 1,000 pages long and includes provisions for a myriad of healthcare issues.

Dion Hinchcliffe / Flickr

If you haven’t noticed yet, it’s cold outside. Like, really, really cold. So cold, in fact, that the National Weather Service issued a wind chill advisory for the Milwaukee area, which has been experiencing windchills - unsurprising, considering windchills dipped well below zero last night.

Meteorologists have blamed the extreme cold on an interesting weather phenomenon: an arctic cold front, or arctic winds. 

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