Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Larry / Fotolia

The U.S. Supreme Court’s long-awaited ruling on Gill v. Whitford came down Monday. But the court didn't rule on the constitutinality question surrounding the claims of illegal partisan gerrymandering in the Wisconsin redistricting cast. 

Instead, the court ruled that the plaintiffs did not have legal standing to bring the suit. The justices threw the case back to lower courts, where the plaintiffs could adjust their case accordingly.

chombosan / Fotolia

Scientists at universities around the country often rely on outside money to fund their research, and this can pose some challenges. Often, financial grants and awards come with a lot of strings attached, which can limit how and what scientists research.

But the Shaw Scientist Award is a bit different. Named for late Milwaukee attorney James Shaw, this award is given to a scientist rather than a specific research project.

Alinghi3 / Wikimedia

The Mount Pleasant Village Board declared an area in the footprint of the proposed FoxConn plant as “blighted.” The vote was just the latest step in the village’s attempt to acquire the land for the construction of the development.

While some residents in the "blighted" area have already come to an agreement with the municipality, there are still some holdouts. Now it seems the village may try to acquire the rest of the land through eminent domain.

Courtesy of UWM Cultural Resource Management

From 1882 until 1974, the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery served as the burial site of many of Milwaukee’s marginalized citizens. The cemetery became the final resting place for many of the community’s poor, as well as those who died as a resident of one of the county institutions or were unidentified or unclaimed from the coroner’s office.

Ted Eytan / Wikimedia

The Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 paved the way for the creation of National Public Radio, which formally began on February 26, 1970.

NPR has come a long way since its earliest days, moving from a time when it was seen as alternative and experimental, to the point today where it boasts the most listened-to morning radio show in the United States.

Vasiliy / Fotolia

As you get ready for your Memorial Day weekend picnic or barbecue, don’t forget the cheese!

Jeanette Hurt is Lake Effect's regular ambassador to the world of Wisconsin cheeses, and she joined Mitch Teich in studio to talk about the art of pairing cheese with tea. While that may seem odd to some, Hurt says that pairing cheese and tea is very similar to pairing cheese with a wine. 

Tomasz Zajda / Fotolia

The Milwaukee Police Department has been bracing for the public reaction to bodycamera footage showing the tasing of Bucks rookie player Sterling Brown. The incident happened this past January, and according to some officials familiar with the footage, it raises concerns about how the officers behaved in this incident.

Rawf8 / Fotolia

The civil war in Syria has been ongoing for more than seven years. Some estimates put the casualties at near half a million and the chaos of the war has contributed to the global refugee crisis.

More than five million people have fled the country, but there are even more displaced people still living in the wartorn nation, many lacking access to medical care. In response to the crisis, the Isreali Defense Force has enlisted the help of Israeli hospitals, located relatively near the Syrian border, to care for people impacted by the war.

Cory Trepanier / Facebook

There are parts of our planet where most of us will never have the opportunity to travel. But thanks to people like Cory Trepanier, we still have the opportunity to see them.

Hear What's in the Heart / youtube.com

Steve Scionti’s “Hear What’s in the Heart: An Italian Shoemaker's Tale,” is a one-man exploration of the Italian-American experience. Scionti is the playwright and sole performer of the show, which documents his experiences growing up in Middletown, Connecticut.

Rick Ebbers

A lot has happened to the members of Buffalo Gospel over the past five years. The alt-country group released their first album, We Can Be Horses, in 2013 to critical acclaim.

But as lead singer Ryan Necci explains, losses - both personal and professional - delayed the release of their latest album.

There’s a lot of talk about the many dangers facing bees in the United States and how important these pollinators are to the environment and agriculture. But when we talk about bees, we tend to focus on just one type: honey bees.

In fact, honey bees and other kinds of social bees make up just 2% of the more than 20,000 different types of bees in the world.

Tiko / Fotolia

An analysis of felony second offense marijuana possession in Milwaukee County has found a troubling pattern. Of the 95 stops where no other crime was being committed, 86% of the people arrested were African-American.

The number is startling in a county where African-Americans makeup only 25% of the population, and the circumstances of some of the arrests seemed questionable.

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Journal

While Milwaukee is often cited as the most segregated metropolitan area in the U.S., it’s hardly unusual. In most American cities, people of different races live in different neighborhoods and there’s a general pattern: neighborhoods near the center of a city are home to African-Americans and people of color, while the surrounding suburbs are majority white. But why?

FOXCONN, TWITTER

When the State of Wisconsin announced a deal with the tech manufacturing company Foxconn, many Wisconsinites were first struck by the price tag. The initial announcement of $3 billion dollars in subsidies, was the largest subsidy in the state’s history.

By some estimates that number has since risen to $4 billion dollars. But as the plans for the factory move forward, more residents have become concerned about some of the other aspects of this deal. Some are concerned about the plant’s intense water needs, others have raised issues with the types of jobs they will be providing.

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