Karen Gwee

For Johanna Warren, spirituality and humanity are inextricable from each other: "it's all energy," as she writes in an email to NPR. The Portland singer-songwriter has been around a while — her voice, clear as water, has shadowed the records of Iron & Wine, Natalie Merchant and Julie Byrne.

Ever since Shopping's formation in 2012, the London post-punk trio has aimed to quicken the feet and sway the hips. The latest track carrying this modus operandi is "The Hype," the band's first song since the 2015 album Why Choose.

Shilpa Ray is nothing if not honest. Her new album, Door Girl, captures New York nightlife in all its sordid, sweaty chaos and supplies caustic commentary on life in the unfeeling city.

Sometimes there's nothing better than dancing away your heartbreak. Novelty Daughter — or Brooklyn-based jazz-electronic-pop musician Faith Harding — knows as much. "U Want What I Want," the first single from her forthcoming, self-released album Inertia, is a plaintive piece of forlorn dance-pop.

Kelly Clarkson has long been a force in pop music, from 2004's "Breakaway" to her most recent smash, 2015's "Heartbeat Song," and now she's poised to release her eighth album, Meaning of Life, on October 27, led by the sensual single she released today, "Love So Soft."

Bruce Springsteen was born to run, but Weaves would rather walk away. "Walkaway," the newest song from the Toronto art rockers and the next single from their forthcoming album Wide Open, certainly channels the Boss in its anthemic spirit, but it remains loose and vulnerable in a way that is all Weaves' own.

This weekend, Bay Area music festival Outside Lands celebrates its 10th anniversary, and you can listen to many of its eclectically-curated sets right here.

Advisory: This is a live stream. Language is unpredictable.

In a chaotic world stuffed with stimulation, Florist offers a respite. Formed by singer and songwriter Emily Sprague, guitarist Jonnie Baker and bassist Rick Spataro, the Brooklyn-based band make gentle synth-folk music that, pared down to the textural and emotional essentials, still remains spacious and inviting.

When you've encountered someone condescending, patronizing or downright toxic, in the moment it can often be difficult to know how to conduct yourself. Insults are always trickier to deal with when wrapped up in niceties, after all. Only hours later, in the shower perhaps, after working out just why and how that comment got to you, do you realize: you should've just told them to shove off.

This new Empress Of song is perfect for that kind of moment.