Maayan Silver

Lake Effect Assistant Producer

Maayan Silver is an assistant producer for WUWM's Lake Effect program. She is also a practicing criminal defense attorney, NPR listener and student of journalism and radio production.

Kat Schleicher

Pastime Paradise, As, I Wish. Many are familiar with the original versions of these songs by music legend Stevie Wonder.

Anna Shternshis

You may be familiar with Yiddish as the language that brought us, among others, the words shlep (carry), kvetch (complain), and nosh (eat). It’s only spoken in limited communities today, but for nearly 1000 years Yiddish was the primary language of Ashkenazi Jews all over Europe -- until the Holocaust.

Michelle Brafman

Places like Washington D.C. and New York City get a lot of attention as urban centers. So much so that their suburban surroundings are often overlooked or derided. The late New York City mayor Ed Koch queried, “Have you ever lived in the suburbs? … It’s sterile. It’s nothing. It’s wasting your life.”

Connie Ma / Flickr

Life has moved along a bit since the 1980s, but certain concepts from that time still remain fresh. In 1989, urban sociologist Ray Oldenburg wrote The Great, Good Place. The book highlights local spots that are not considered work or home, but somewhere to informally gather and socialize. Cafes, coffee shops, bookstores, bars and barbershops are all considered "third places" where community, civic engagement and civil discourse is encouraged.

Courtesy of The Milwaukee Journal

Segregation in metro Milwaukee can be traced back, in part, to discriminatory housing practices like redlining and racial restrictive covenants. During the Civil Rights movement, there was large-scale pushback against such practices.

Stuart Seeger / Flickr

It used to be that coaches and trainers didn’t pay much attention when an athlete took a blow to the head during practice or competition. But that attitude has changed drastically over the last couple decades.

"I think we've gone a complete 180," says Lindsay Nelson, an assistant professor of neurosurgery and neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. 

Scott Olson / Getty Images

It is an uncertain time to be a refugee trying to come to the United States. It’s an equally uncertain time for those who have made it their life’s work to resettle refugees in the U.S.

Mary Flynn is the program director of Refugee & Immigrant Services at Lutheran Social Services of Wisconsin and Upper Michigan. Since 1974, the organization has resettled more than 10,000 refugees from 15 countries.

Michelle Maternowski

Anyone who grew up in Milwaukee or who lived here before 2005 may remember a pungent yeast smell in the Menomonee Valley, around I-94. 

Listener Dan Dickover of Bay View was one of those people. He moved to the city in 1997, and asked Bubbler Talk: "For the last few years I haven’t really smelled that smell anymore, so I was wondering why that is.” 

David Sherman

Whether it's the travel ban or the temporary suspension of refugee admissions, immigration issues are at the forefront these days. As the United States and the world grapple with refugees from Africa and the Middle East, in the 1930s and '40s, the international community needed to respond to the increasing number of European Jews fleeing Nazi Germany.  

University of Wisconsin Press

Crime and punishment. It’s not just a Dostoevsky novel, it’s also a very real issue that unfolds in courts around Wisconsin.  

When a defendant is convicted of a crime, he or she goes in front of a judge to be sentenced. But the story doesn’t begin and end there. Beyond the judges, there are many actors affecting what happens to that defendant before, during and after sentencing, from legislators and electors to parole boards and corrections departments.

"I like 'em brown, yellow, Puerto Rican or Haitian/Name is Phife Dawg from the Zulu Nation," rhymes the late MC Malik Izaak Taylor, aka 'Phife Dawg,' of the hip hop group A Tribe Called Quest on the track Electric Relaxation. 

Warning: This video contains uncensored language.

Maayan Silver

From the outside, it appears as though not much is going at the Milwaukee Mall. But inside, local entrepreneurs are running businesses, and running them without a lot of outside support. Located on the triangular intersection of Fond du Lac and North Avenue, the building was originally a Sears, Roebuck & Company store, built in 1927. Local newspapers at the time reported that it brought hundreds of jobs into the area.

Joanna Eldredge Morrissey

Poet Jodie Hollander's aim is to make words sing, no matter where in the world she is writing them. 

Hollander was born and raised in Milwaukee. But for the past two decades, she has been traveling the world developing her craft.

Maayan Silver

Nestled between Miller Brewery and Harley Davidson on the west and Marquette University on the east, Milwaukee's near west side neighborhood is dotted with mansions and other historic spots from the 1800s and 1900s.

There's the Pabst Mansion, completed in 1892 to house the family of Milwaukee's famed beer barons; the Ambassador Hotel, an art deco retreat built in the 1920s and the Irish Cultural Center, which is housed in what was originally the Grand Avenue Congregational Church built in 1887. 

Courtesy of Kim Motley

Watching the documentary Motley's Law, you might think that Attorney Kim Motley is some sort of super hero.

The Milwaukee-born former public defender went to Afghanistan on a "Rule of Law" program in 2008 set up by the federal government in order to train and mentor Afghan defense attorneys. In 2009, she left the program and set up a law practice in Kabul, becoming the first and only foreigner licensed to practice law there.

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