Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

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Tracy Symonds-Keogh

A federal appeals court on Friday overturned a ruling that could have freed a Wisconsin inmate featured in the Netflix series "Making a Murderer."  The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decided that police properly obtained Brendan Dassey's confession, and he should remain in prison. 

The judges were sharply divided, voting 4-3 that authorities did not cajole Dassey into admitting his crimes.  Dassey was sentenced to life in prison in 2007, after he told detectives that he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill photographer Teresa Halbach. 

Leaders in the state Assembly -- from both parties -- stated last week that they won't release records related to claims of sexual harassment within the chamber, in order to protect victims' privacy.  WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com how the decision might sit with constituents.

Ross also talks about the likelihood of the state Legislature approving Gov. Walker's request for $7 million to launch a massive ad campaign to attract Foxconn workers -- and we discuss whether the governor will appoint a conservative candidate for Milwaukee County Sheriff.

Several dozen people shared their ideas Thursday night, on how to build better relations between Milwaukee police and the community. The group, African American Roundtable held a town hall meeting on the north side. We stopped by the gathering and asked people about their concerns.

Sheila Hills lives in Milwaukee’s Metcalfe Park neighborhood. She says the area is struggling, and there are issues that contribute to crime.

“I see a lot of unemployment there and that idles people. It stagnates the neighborhood and I see a lot of boarded up houses.”

promesaartstudio, fotolia

The 2018 governor's race continues to take shape.  Democrats are still entering -- or considering getting into -- the race.  And, Republican incumbent Scott Walker has officially launched his re-election bid.  For a look at where things stand today, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson checked in with JR Ross of wispolitics.com.

Ross says Democrats Tony Evers, Dana Wachs and Andy Gronik appear to be top-tier candidates at this stage of the game.

The biggest issues in the race will likely be Foxconn, Gov. Walker's jobs promise, transportation and education.

John Moore/Getty Images

Milwaukee County is taking some big steps in its effort to combat opioid addiction. The county has received grants totaling more than $2.5 million to help boost two programs that help people addicted to opiates get back on their feet.

Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele announced the new grants at the Juvenile Justice Center in Wauwatosa. He told the group that gathered that opioid addiction has reached epidemic proportions. Abele says the number of deaths is staggering, and it dwarfs just about anything else in history.

Wisconsin U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson broke with fellow Republican lawmakers last week.  He announced he would not vote for the tax package that many in the GOP are eager to approve.  This isn't the first time Johnson has separated himself from the pack. 

WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wiscpolitics.com to share his thoughts on Johnson's actions, as part of this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation.

Wisconsin Department of Corrections

Milwaukee community leaders are calling on Gov. Scott Walker to close the Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake juvenile facilities in northern Wisconsin. The state-run prisons have been plagued by accusations of abuse – from both inmates and guards.

Many inmates are from Milwaukee. It’s unclear whether the governor will comply with the request.

Marti Mikkelson

The huge Foxconn plant appears to be moving forward, now that Gov. Walker and company officials have signed a contract. There’s still a long way to go until groundbreaking, but some of Foxconn’s neighbors are already thinking about how the factory will impact their businesses.

Gov. Walker and Foxconn officials signed the contract in Racine last week, at a celebration with several hundred people. Walker, who's called the deal "transformational" for the state, touted its enormous potential.

After months of contentious debate, Gov. Walker and Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn have signed a contract.  Under the deal, Wisconsin will provide $3 billion in incentives, to help the company build a huge LCD screen factory.  Foxconn says the plant, located in Racine County, will create up to three thousand jobs. 

The state Assembly passed a bill Thursday that would restrict public access to police body camera footage. Those videos often are used in trial to help determine guilt or innocence.

In some cases, they’ve been released to the public when an officer is accused of wrongdoing – including in the trial for former Milwaukee police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown. He was acquitted earlier this year in the shooting death of Sylville Smith in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation Board Wednesday approved key provisions of a contract for Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn to build a huge LCD screen manufacturing facility in Racine County.  

The plant is expected to employ up to 13,000 people and Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill in September that provides a $3 billion incentives package for the company to locate here. 

The WEDC Board voted 8-2 to approve terms of the contract that would allow execution of the incentives. 

Megan Dobyns

Update: 

The Milwaukee Common Council voted 10-5 Tuesday to override the mayor's veto of a resolution that would give aldermen the authority to fire the Police Chief.

The move doesn't give the council a green light to remove Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn from office. Rather, they would have to approve his firing, with a two-thirds vote. And, before that could take place, state lawmakers would also need to take action.

Alderman Bob Donovan was in the majority. And, before the vote, he said the city is in need of change.

The state agency tasked with overseeing the huge Foxconn incentives package is expected to vote on it this week.  Under the deal, brokered by Gov. Walker's team, the state will give the Taiwanese electronics giant $3 billion -- and ease environmental regulations -- to help Foxconn build a massive LCD screen plant in Racine County. 

Justin W Kern

State lawmakers are floating an idea for how to crack down on human trafficking and prostitution. They're considering a bill that would enlist the help of truck drivers, whose routes take them throughout the state. An assembly committee is scheduled to vote on the item Wednesday. Some victims' advocates approve of the measure, but say the state should also employ other innovative strategies.

Wisconsin Department of Corrections

Wisconsin's troubled juvenile prison, Lincoln Hills, keeps making headlines.  Investigations into the state-run facility in northern Wisconsin began over two years ago, over claims that the teenage inmates were being mistreated. 

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