Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

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It was a long night for supporters of Republican state Sen. Alberta Darling. The incumbent survived her recall, defeating Democratic Rep. Sandy Pasch 54 to 46 percent. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson attended Darling’s victory party in Thiensville.

The subject of Indian school mascots will pop up again on Wednesday. The former Legislature approved a law requiring school districts to remove Indian logos, if they offend any residents. To keep the logo, the district must prove to the Department of Public Instruction that the name and caricature are not offensive. On Wednesday, a Waukesha County judge is expected to rule on the constitutionality of the mandate. Two Mukwonago residents are contesting it. They claim it’s vague and that the state violated their rights by not giving notice of a hearing. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson visited Mukwonago High School, which has been given more time to remove its Indians logo and nickname.

Community leaders say a skilled and educated workforce along with transportation options for it, are keys to ensuring the economic success of southeastern Wisconsin.

There’s been a significant increase in Milwaukee County in the number of young, African-American gay men infected with HIV. The state Division of Public Health puts the increase at 144 percent over eight years. On Monday, there was a daylong conference in town about ways of reducing infection rates among young, black men. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports on efforts already underway to educate a demographic that can be difficult to reach.

Despite the sluggish economy, there’s been a slight uptick in restaurant ownership in Milwaukee. The health department reports 1,461 eateries: that’s 26 more than last year and on par with the number before the recession hit. At least one establishment in the Third Ward, south of downtown, appears to be bouncing back. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson found that some of the ‘new’ establishments are actually recycled restaurants. Entrepreneurs have moved in, believing they possess the formula for success.

The state Assembly approved Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill early Friday morning. It contains a provision that would strip public employees of most collective bargaining rights and has been the subject of massive protests at the capitol in the past ten days. UW-Madison student Lance Janssen says the debate isn't over because the state Senate still has to vote. He plans to return to the capitol in the next few days.

More protests are planned in Madison on Thursday. The state Capitol has become the center of opposition to Walker administration plans to virtually abolish state labor unions. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson is in Madison and has been speaking with some of the thousands of protesters as well as supporters of the governor's plans.

The halls of the state Capitol are expected to be packed again today as the state legislature prepares to vote on a proposal to strip state employees of most collective bargaining rights. Marti Mikkelson is in Madison and file this report.

For the second day in a row Wednesday, thousands of people converged on the state Capitol, many of them upset with Gov. Walker’s proposal to eliminate most collective bargaining rights for public workers.

Southeastern Wisconsin has long been a leader in the world of manufacturing. That reputation might conjure images of machinery and tools. But nine percent of the items manufactured here are food products.

There are more than 250 food and beverage factories in southeastern Wisconsin, and the economic development group, the M7, estimates that those companies employ more than 14,000 workers and generate nearly $600 million in annual salaries. In this installment of “Project Milwaukee: What’s on our Plate?” WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson takes us to several operations that have been growing.

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