Michelle Maternowski

Digital Services Coordinator

Michelle joined WUWM in 2007 as an assistant producer for Lake Effect. In 2008, she was hired full-time as WUWM's Web Marketing Specialist. And in 2014, Michelle was named WUWM's Digital Services Coordinator. She is responsible for managing WUWM's digital and social media content, strategizing and implementing WUWM's digital endeavors and overseeing WUWM.com.

Michelle holds bachelor degrees in Marketing and Political Science from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

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Henryk Sadura, Fotolia

A new analysis of census and other population data shows that the Milwaukee metropolitan area (Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis) is among the regions seeing the most dramatic increases in the number of Black and Latino people living in neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty. 

The report, titled Architecture of Segregation: Civil Unrest, the Concentration of Poverty, and Public Policy, was released by The Century Foundation

Daniela A Nievergelt / Flickr

The water slides in the Wisconsin Dells today are a strange, accidental metaphor for the area's geological history. 

An ice dam that broke towards the end of the last Ice Age sent water from a glacial lake down the Wisconsin River, carving the fanatical sandstone cliffs that distinguish the Dells today.

That's one of many reasons why geologist Marcia Bjornerus sees beyond the Wisconsin Dells' water parks, tacky shirt shops, and salt water taffy. 

S Bence

Keith Hayes was among the first to recognize the potential of a former rail corridor, where Milwaukee's Harambee and Riverwest neighborhoods intersect. The space, now called the artery, stretches from W. Keefe Avenue up to W. Capitol Drive.

Enrico Fuente, flickr

Finding a way to stop the lethal upswing in youth violence in Milwaukee has become ever more imperative.

Paul Kjelland

Yesterday’s installment of Precious Lives centered on the story of four people who had been in the crowd just feet from where 14 year old Tariq Akbar was shot and killed following Milwaukee’s Independence Day fireworks along the lakefront.

But the shooting touched more than the victim and those four people in the crowd. And the ways its impacts differ says a lot about the situation that has yielded Milwaukee’s difficult summer of gun violence.

WUWM 89.7 FM - Milwaukee Public Radio is a finalist for two Salute to Excellence National Media Awards from the National Association of Black Journalists, or NABJ.

Radio – Long form (Markets 16 & Below)
Project Milwaukee: Black Men in Prison by WUWM Radio

City of Milwaukee Office of Environmental Sustainability

Milwaukee wants to be known as a city that embraces sustainability.

For five years, as head of Milwaukee's Office of Environmental Sustainability, Matt Howard was the face of those efforts. 

Adam Carr

If you've ever driven down Sherman Boulevard through the Sherman Park neighborhood, you've probably noticed a large, strikingly elegant building with a "for sale" sign out front.

At least one person thinks that in the right hands the former auction house could play a vital role in transforming the Sherman Park neighborhood.

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Friday marks day seven of the 15-day urban garden blitz in the Milwaukee area.

Several hundred volunteers are ferrying wooden planks and trucking mound upon mound of soil to build, and fill 4x8 raised garden beds. The effort is in its 7th season and is the brainchild of the Victory Garden Initiative, or VGI.

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Most of the Kinnickinnic River looks like a giant drainage ditch. However, work is underway to restore the river to it's natural flow.

Back in the 1960s, the KK was channelized with concrete slopes. At the time, the technique was considered to be a state-of-the-art storm water management system. Instead, the channels led to devastating flooding.

By 2007, the river was named one of the 10 most endangered rivers in the United States.

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