UPDATE: Federal Appeals Court Reinstates Wisconsin's Voter ID Law

Sep 12, 2014

Just hours after judges in Chicago heard oral arguments on Friday and Gov. Walker changed a rule, the court reinstated Wisconsin's Voter ID law.

Appeals court wasted no time, in determining the voting procedure for Wisconsin's November 4 Election

It requires people to present a government-issued identification card, in order to vote. The fall election is less than two months away.

Earlier Friday, Governor Walker approved a way people can obtain photo identification, for free, if they don't have the necessary documents. In order to get a government ID card, people must present their birth certificate, and obtaining a copy, has cost a fee.

Starting Monday, people who visit DMV offices in Wisconsin to get a state ID card, will only have to provide their birth date, and another state agency will verify the data. No charge will be assessed.

Opponents of the Voter ID law sued the state, claiming the requirement would discourage some people from voting because they lack the proper government identification.

Supporters of Voter ID insist it will deter fraud.

While the federal appeals court in Chicago reinstated Wisconsin's law on Friday, the judges did not rule on the law's constitutionality - that decision will come, at a later date.

U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman struck down the law in April and halted its enforcement.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court upheld the law in July, but told the state that it could not force people to pay a fee for the right to vote - a fee that might be needed to get the proper identification.  

The following list contains the forms of identification Wisconsin polling places will accept:

- Wisconsin Driver's License

- Wisconsin Identification Card (issued by DOT)

- Military ID Card

- U.S. Passport

- Certificate of Naturalization (issued within two years of the election)

- Driving Receipt (issued by Wisconsin DOT)

- Wisconsin Identification Card Receipt

- Identification card issued by federally-recognized Indian tribes in Wisconsin

- Photo ID from Wisconsin accredited universities/colleges AND a document that proves enrollment