Here and Now

Airs Weekdays at noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

This midday newsmagazine combines updates on the top national and international news stories of the day with intelligent, broad-ranging conversations. This daily conversation about news, arts and culture is hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

Distributed by: NPR, Produced at: WBUR

Selling rhino horn internationally has been illegal for 40 years. But it’s now legal to sell rhino horn within the borders of South Africa, the country with 80 percent of the world’s rhinos. A court there removed a moratorium on the domestic rhino horn trade earlier this year.

As NPR’s Peter Granitz (@pgranitz) reports from the capital, Pretoria, one rhino farmer in South Africa hopes to auction some of his stockpiled rhino horn — and the sale is not without controversy.

Already this year, more than 6,000 people have illegally walked across the U.S. border into Quebec. Nearly half of them crossed last month. One of the most popular illegal border crossing areas is in Vermont just west of Lake Champlain, along a rural road in the woods.

Vermont Public Radio’s Kathleen Masterson (@kathmasterson) went to the border crossing spot, and has this report.

Grayson, Kentucky, cafeteria manager Jason Smith didn’t have any formal culinary training, but he had a dream: to be a Food Network star. After 10 weeks of cooking, food demonstrations and exuding plenty of Southern charm, Smith’s dream came true.

Clemson, South Carolina, was one of the places across the U.S. located in the solar eclipse’s path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Nell Greenfieldboyce (@nell_sci_NPR), NPR science correspondent, about what she and other viewers in Clemson witnessed.

Ten sailors are missing from the USS John McCain after a collision with an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters.

Bradley Peniston (@navybook), deputy editor at Defense One, says it’s the fourth collision involving a U.S. Navy ship in just over a year. Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the latest.

Doctors are warning spectators not to look directly at the sun without protection during Monday’s eclipse. It can cause permanent damage like solar retinopathy or blindness, especially for people outside the path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dr. Nhung H. Brandenburg, president of the Georgia Optometric Association, about how to view the eclipse safely.

How Did North Korea Get Nuclear Weapons?

Aug 17, 2017

In an interview with The American Prospect, White House strategist Steve Bannon said “there’s no military solution” to North Korea’s growing nuclear weapons program. Going against President Trump’s threat of “fire and fury,” Bannon suggested Trump should tone down the brinkmanship with North Korea and focus on China instead.

But how did North Korea get its nuclear weapons in the first place?

Attacker Drives Van Into Barcelona Crowd

Aug 17, 2017

A white van jumped up onto a sidewalk and sped down a pedestrian zone Thursday in Barcelona’s historic Las Ramblas district, swerving from side to side as it plowed into tourists and residents.

NPR’s Camila Domonoske (@camilareads) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with the latest.

With reporting from The Associated Press

President Trump is placing blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend on “both sides,” including counter-protesters. But what is true about what happened that day?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sarah Rankin (@sarah_rankin), a reporter for The Associated Press who was in Charlottesville that day.

A new study in Kentucky is raising alarms about teens’ mental health in the state. The biannual Kentucky Incentives for Prevention survey found that 8.2 percent of Kentucky high school sophomores had attempted suicide in the past year. For sixth graders, that rate was 4.2 percent. The study found increases in every age group it looked at.

There have been five mass extinction events in the history of the Earth. In his book “The Ends of the World,” author Peter Brannen looks at what happened to cause these crises — from massive volcanic eruptions to asteroids — and tries to determine what our future might bring.

In a few weeks, teenagers will stumble bleary eyed and yawning into middle and high schools to beat that early morning bell. But in California, that could change by 2020. That’s if the state legislature passes a bill next month which would require all middle and high schools to open at 8:30 a.m. or later.

In Seattle, where thousands of employees drive to work every day, parking can be a nightmare. But some companies and organizations — pushed by state and local government — are working to reduce the number of solo-car commutes by charging for parking by day, instead of on a monthly basis.

On Aug. 21, most North Americans will see at least a partial solar eclipse. But people in 12 states — in a 70-mile-wide swath from Oregon to South Carolina — will experience a total eclipse. The schedule is known with precision, but how do we know all this and when did we first know it?

Suspended Fox News host Eric Bolling has initiated a $50 million lawsuit against HuffPost reporter Yashar Ali, after Ali released a report last Friday claiming Bolling sent unwanted, inappropriate text messages to female colleagues at Fox News in the past.

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