Lake Effect

Airs Weekdays at 10 am & Weekends at 3 pm

Lake Effect, WUWM’s locally-produced magazine program, covers a lot of ground, focusing on your neighbors and your issues. From discussing politics and the economy to spotlighting Wisconsin authors and musicians, Lake Effect goes beyond the headlines. Join the Lake Effect team as they open a window onto life in Milwaukee and southeastern Wisconsin.

Friday on Lake Effect

A look at how the GOP’s proposed healthcare reform replacement may compare to what existed before Obamacare. Later, the Master Singers of Milwaukee feature the musical traditions of Slovenia and its neighbors in their latest program. Bubbler Talk wades into the future of the Milwaukee Harbor area. And a preview of Milwaukee Opera Theatre’s madcap production of The Mikado.

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Thursday on Lake Effect

A Milwaukee nonprofit prepares for the possibility of AmeriCorps budget cuts. Later, prolific and distinctive Wisconsin writer, Jerry Apps, offers a tour of his hundreds of acres in Central Wisconsin. Then, food contributor Kyle Cherek explains why chefs are drawn to creating pop-up dining experiences. And a behind-the-scenes look at Skylight Music Theatre's Beauty and the Beast which features larger-than-life puppetry. 

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Wednesday on Lake Effect:

Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin explains why she currently opposes the proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act, known as "TrumpCare." Then, some insight on the debate over high-capacity wells in Wisconsin. We go behind the scenes on a conversation between eight Milwaukee area chefs, and get a preview of the Florentine Opera's Don Giovanni.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect:

A former refugee from war-torn Bosnia remembers how she escaped and talks about her life in the US. Later, meteorologist Mike Westendorf looks at the challenging parts of his business and the emotional impact of weather. And artist Jeffrey Gibson talks about the nature of his work, which is on display at Marquette University’s Haggerty Museum.

Guests:

  • Zijada Beganovic, former Bosnian refugee
  • Mike Westendorf, meteorologist
  • Jeffrey Gibson, artist

Monday on Lake Effect:

We examine the rise of right-wing populist movements in Europe, and how they compare to current politics in the United States. Later, an 86-year old Grafton man shares the chilling story of the day the Germans marched into town before World War II. We stop by a historic building and a Milwaukee workspace that is trying to connect start-up entrepreneurs across a wide spectrum. Plus, a performance by singer-songwriter Glen Phillips.

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This weekend on Lake Effect:

We hear two interviews from our recent series Project Milwaukee: Segregation Matters. David Pate explains what makes segregation such a challenge in Milwaukee, versus anyplace else in the country. Then, how two suburban social studies teachers have taken it upon themselves to make race something their students talk about year-round. Plus, the latest episodes of Radio Chipstone and our storytelling series Ex Fabula.

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Friday on Lake Effect:

Thursday on Lake Effect

Project Milwaukee: Segregation Matters continues with how segregation and environmental health are linked. We hear perspectives from both national and local sources. Later, an effort to solve a challenge in some Milwaukee neighborhoods: easy access to fresh food. And Reince Priebus’s unlikely rise from a Republican candidate in Kenosha to White House chief-of-staff.

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Wednesday on Lake Effect

Project Milwaukee: Segregation Matters continues with a look at the sheer complexity of the issue and why it’s so difficult to solve. Then, how segregation impacts access to healthcare. Later, a UW-Madison medical school program aims at easing the urban doctor shortage in Milwaukee.

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Tuesday on Lake Effect

Project Milwaukee: Segregation Matters continues with a look at education. We meet two suburban social studies teachers who have taken it upon themselves to make race something their students talk about year-round. Later, writer Kwame Alexander says literature can be a great tool for fostering empathy in young readers. And we get a primer on what Vitamin D really does for the human body.

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Monday on Lake Effect:

The Project Milwaukee series, Segregation Matters, continues. We examine data that demonstrates the extent of segregation in the city and a key factor that contributes to it. Later, a new project works to ease an issue facing the city’s impoverished neighborhoods: evictions. And a Milwaukee pastor and veteran of the Civil Rights movement offers his thoughts about the state of segregation in Milwaukee today.

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This weekend on Lake Effect:

A photographer comes to Milwaukee to document the stories of Black Milwaukeeans who migrated here decades ago. Then, Emmy award winning actress Erika Slezak reflects on the start her professional career fifty years ago in Milwaukee. Plus we’ll have the latest episode of our storytelling series Ex Fabula.

Guests:

  • Chris Arnade, writer & photographer
  • Erika Slezak, actress
  • Leah DeLaney, Ex Fabula co-founder; Bruce Winter, WUWM

Friday on Lake Effect:

Our Project Milwaukee series, Segregation Matters gets underway in earnest, with a look at how Milwaukee got to be such a segregated place in the first place. Then we learn how segregation impacts the Latino community in Milwaukee - including in its schools. Plus, a conservative activist’s case for responding to climate change.

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Thursday on Lake Effect:

We preview our upcoming Project Milwaukee series on segregation with reporter Ann-Elise Henzl.  Plus, we revisit a 2009 interview about the legacy of Milwaukee's open housing marches and look at how little has changed.  Reporter Dan Egan explains the complex web of problems facing the Great Lakes in his expansive new book.  And a new anthology examines what it means to be a feminist in 2017.

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Wednesday on Lake Effect:

A photographer comes to Milwaukee to document the stories of Black Milwaukeeans who migrated here decades ago. Then, actress Erika Slezak won six Emmys for her role in the soap opera, One Life to Live.  But today she looks back of the start of her professional career fifty years ago in Milwaukee. Plus, hip-hop-reggae-rock musician Matisyahu explains why of all the art forms out there, live music is the most interactive for the audience.

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