Marketplace

Airs Weekdays at 6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In 30-minutes, Marketplace breaks down the day's business and economic news. With a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, the stories range from impacting your wallet to Wall Street. Marketplace Morning Report presents the morning business news at 5:50 and 7:50 am weekdays. MMR is hosted by David Brancaccio.

Distributed by: American Public Media

A former coal miner's take on the declining industry

Jun 23, 2017
coal_4.jpg
Lizzie O'Leary and Paulina Velasco

It's been hard to escape the narrative of the coal miner over the last year. President Trump talks a lot about putting coal miners back to work, and he's rolled back Obama-era regulations aimed at doing just that.

But setting narratives aside, the numbers show coal is declining. Natural gas is cheaper to use to make electricity. And many of the people who have done this work don't see much of a future for themselves in coal.

GettyImages-698679650_0.jpg
Kai Ryssdal

Rachel Abrams from The New York Times and Sheelah Kolhatkar from The New Yorker join us to discuss the week's business and economic news. Now that Senate Republicans have unveiled their health care plan, a bill drafted in secret, we look at the potential impact it will have on low-income earners and how it could redistribute wealth to the rich.

President Trump's practice of calling out major U.S. corporations to publicly pressure them to keep jobs in the U.S. has been well publicized since the 2016 election campaign. Trump has in the past, for example, criticized the air conditioning company Carrier for plans to move jobs to Mexico. He then took credit when the company agreed to a plan enhanced by state tax breaks to keep a thousand jobs in Indiana. He's also put pressure on Ford, GM and Toyota over U.S. jobs.

Two industry groups that represent cattle ranchers have filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Agriculture. They want the USDA to reinstate country-of-origin labeling for beef, because they say consumers want to purchase meat from animals born, raised and slaughtered in the U.S. For example, pieces of beef from Canada can come across the border to a U.S. processing plant, get ground into hamburger, and that hamburger then sold without any indication of its origin.

It was a busy day on Wall Street today, and there was good reason for that. It was the annual reshuffling of the popular trading benchmarks known as the FTSE Russell Indexes. Those indexes track the largest U.S. companies in the U.S. stock market, and they determine what’s in a bunch of securities mutual funds. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

The Wall Street Journal made a phone for just 70 bucks

Jun 23, 2017
GettyImages-466477804.jpg
Kai Ryssdal and Maria Hollenhorst

The $600 to $800 price tag on the latest Apple or Samsung smartphone could create some serious sticker shock, especially compared to the much cheaper models from Chinese competitors. Chinese smartphone brands from the Pearl River Delta region and the city of Shenzhen are gaining market share fast. They can contract with manufacturers in Shenzhen who are already tapped into the region's vast smartphone supply chain and pump out low-cost phones under their own brands, no designing or engineering necessary.

Crowdfunding for your life

Jun 23, 2017
GettyImages-464071578.jpg
Lizzie O'Leary and Paulina Velasco

On February 24, 2017, Molly Young got some devastating news. She had breast cancer, at age 29.

"When I took that phone call, and I learned that this was just going to completely uproot my whole life, I'd say I spent maybe 10 seconds or so only freaking out about myself and whether or not I would die. And then immediately thought, 'Oh my gosh, what happens if my health insurance goes away?'" Young said.

GettyImages-633307390.jpg
Sam Beard

Britain’s Brexit negotiations with the European Union have begun. The formal talks over the terms of the United Kingdom’s exit from the EU and the future shape of its trade relationship with the bloc are expected to last at least 15 months and could go on for much longer.

rsz_img_0155.jpg
Robert Garrova

Brought to You By” is our series about all the stuff that’s become part of the culture and of the economy. Where did they came from and who thought of them?

Everyone recognizes Smokey Bear, the lovable National Parks mascot who warns visitors about the dangers of forest fires. But where do those friendly anthropomorphic bear cutouts come from?

06/23/2017: You-know-what

Jun 23, 2017
capitol_1.jpg
Marketplace

We thought we could go the whole day without talking about, um, that big bill the Senate unveiled this week. No dice. But we're getting it out of the way right up top, discussing the Senate's hurry-up-and-wait-outside approach to health care reform and what this bill is really designed to fix. Then: U.K.

06/23/2017: What's going on with America's infrastructure?

Jun 23, 2017

Now that Senate Republicans have released the draft for their bill on health care reform, we'll recap how the markets are doing. Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, joined us to explain why health care stocks have been reacting positively. (Hint: It's not expected to actually pass.) Afterwards, we'll look at what Japan and the European Union have in store for their free-trade agreement, and then explore some of the questions U.S. mayors have surrounding Trump's infrastructure promises. 

More than 250 mayors are in Miami Beach for the annual U.S. Conference of Mayors. A White House infrastructure adviser is there, too, and city leaders have plenty of questions. What’s in Trump’s infrastructure plan as far as federal partnerships with cities and states? The plan includes about 200 million in federal spending to leverage much more in private investments. But how will any public-private partnerships be structured? The American Society of Civil Engineers estimates about $4.6 trillion is needed in infrastructure investments by 2025, so details on funding are crucial.

healthcare_10.jpg
Sabri Ben-Achour

The Senate's version of the Republican health care bill calls for big cuts to Medicaid and would release Americans from the requirement to get health insurance.

Its overall vision is a fiscally conservative one, whose aim is to have consumer behavior pressure companies into delivering the best services possible. But will that pan out?

Japan and the EU head for a massive trade deal

Jun 23, 2017

Japan and the European Union say they’re close to agreement on a broad free-trade deal. It would be the largest such pact for the EU. The two trading partners have been hammering out this deal since 2013, but negotiations have taken on new urgency recently. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Solar tariffs request is dividing the industry

Jun 23, 2017
GettyImages-104627690.jpg
JaeRan Kim

The Los Angeles office of Green Solar Technologies was humming on a recent Tuesday. In dozens of cubicles, sales people were working their phones, following up on sales pitches for solar systems.

Looking out through his large office windows, Edward Harner, chief operating officer of the company, didn't focus on the mountains that were visible but on the houses spread out before him.

Pages