Marketplace

Airs Weekdays at 6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In 30-minutes, Marketplace breaks down the day's business and economic news. With a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, the stories range from impacting your wallet to Wall Street. Marketplace Morning Report presents the morning business news at 5:50 and 7:50 am weekdays. MMR is hosted by David Brancaccio.

Distributed by: American Public Media

04/18/2018: Senior living in style

5 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) Tax Day has changed thanks to some frozen software. After its website crashed, the IRS decided to give people a one-day extension on filing their tax returns. On today's show, we'll give some context surrounding the issue, which may have to do with the agency's shrinking budget. Afterwards, we'll look at what the selection of Cuba's new president could mean for the country's future, and then we'll talk about how baby boomers are reshaping "senior living." Think sophisticated sensors and restaurant-style dining. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service...Facebook lays out how it will comply with strict European privacy regulations, but what does it mean for the future of advertising? Then, after a reportedly secret US visit to North Korea, are tensions between the two nations actually thawing? Afterwards, Saudi Arabia’s first cinema in four decades opens today with a screening of Black Panther. We talk to AMC’s boss about what to expect on opening night…and he reassures us there will be popcorn.  

The U.S. Census has projected that people age 65 or older will outnumber children under 18 by the year 2035. For now, as the baby boomer generation is aging, it is also reshaping senior living — and some older seniors are already trying it out.

What rules exist around our faces, and how are they tracked?

6 hours ago

This week, a federal judge said Facebook must face a class-action lawsuit over facial recognition and how it collects what's called biometric data, such as images of faces and fingerprints. Three users sued Facebook under an Illinois state law that says the company has to get written permission before it collects such data. So far, the only laws against gathering that data come from a handful of states. 

We’re all being photographed, a lot — by each other, and by cameras in public and private spaces.  As our images become more widespread, there’s also more facial recognition technology that’s used to identify us. This week, a federal judge said Facebook must face a lawsuit over its use of facial recognition. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks with Joseph Lorenzo Hall, chief technologist at the Center for Democracy and Technology about the value in this kind of technology, along with what kind of harm it can cause.

Barbara Bush’s literacy legacy

17 hours ago

Former first lady Barbara Bush died today at home in Houston, Texas, according to a statement from her family. She was 92. Over the weekend, the wife of former President George H.W. Bush elected to forgo additional treatment for several health problems.

After the arrest of two black men who sat in a Philadelphia Starbucks without buying a drink, Starbucks is going through a public relations tailspin — and the company can't seem to say mea culpa fast enough.

CEO Kevin Johnson announced today that Starbucks would close its 8,000 company-owned stores on May 29 so that the approximately 175,000 employees could attend a day of bias training. But will that be the end of the company's attempts to restore its image?

Everyone gets another day to file their taxes after IRS site outage

18 hours ago

Americans who waited until the last day to pay their taxes online got an unwelcome surprise: The IRS website to make payments and access other key services went down earlier today.

Now, taxpayers will get a one-day extension, and the filing system is back online.

IMF bumps up U.S. growth projections for 2018

18 hours ago

The International Monetary Fund raised its growth target for the American economy today to 2.9 percent. That’s very close to the three percent forecast the Trump administration promised.  In a conversation about President Donald Trump's tax cuts and the overall state of the economy on Fox News this morning,  Trump's top economic adviser Larry Kudlow said we are starting to see "an economic boom.”

Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal called up Kathy Bostjancic, the chief U.S. financial markets economist at Oxford Economics to get some context on the economic growth projections.

Restaurants say diners are bad at making reservations

20 hours ago

When you try to reserve a table at a restaurant, you make a call or click a button online. But on the restaurant side, things could get messy and complicated. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke to journalist Marissa Conrad about her story  on why diners are bad at making restaurant reservations and how restaurants are trying to change that.

59: Adam ruins our show

20 hours ago

What does the sketch comedy TV show "Adam Ruins Everything" have in common with our podcast? Well, we kinda share the same mission. In his TruTV show, live tours and podcast, comedian Adam Conover takes on topics we think we know about — like dieting, going green, taxes and, uh, circumcision — then punctures our assumptions with facts and comedy. We learn about his process, whether he actually changes minds and truth-squadding in the age of alternative facts. But first we chat about our own news fixations, like who bought divisive digital ads, Beyoncé and currency manipulation.

Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe is in Florida to discuss trade issues with President Donald Trump. One issue on the table: Japan's desire to be excluded from steel and aluminum tariffs that went into effect last month. Other key U.S. allies, including Australia, Canada, the European Union and Mexico have been granted exemptions.

04/17/2018: The Tax Day that wasn't

21 hours ago

It was supposed to be Tax Day in America, but thanks to computer issues at the IRS, everyone gets another day to file. Taxes were still on the docket at the Supreme Court today though — the justices heard South Dakota v. Wayfair Inc. At issue is whether the online retailer and others like it should collect sales tax. We'll follow the money. But first: Starbucks is closing down all 8,000 of its company-owned stores for one day next month to give its 175,000 workers racial bias training.

At least once a week, Reynald Justance visits a small, fairly inconspicuous office building on Orlando’s west side. The building, located across from a shopping plaza, is unmarked, except for a yellow sign by its door that reads in French: Authorized CAM Agent Serving the Community. 

CAM, short for “Caribbean Air Mail,” is a popular wire service with agencies in Haitian beauty salons, bakeries, shopping plazas — and office buildings.  

(Markets Edition) Starting today, the Supreme Court will hear a case on whether out-of-state businesses should pay South Dakota state and local taxes if they ship a product to a state. We'll take a brief look at the advantage online retailers have in not charging sales taxes, and why Amazon might actually be at a disadvantage here. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report showing that we're not building new homes fast enough to meet demand in 22 states.

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