Marketplace

Airs Weekdays at 6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In 30-minutes, Marketplace breaks down the day's business and economic news. With a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, the stories range from impacting your wallet to Wall Street. Marketplace Morning Report presents the morning business news at 5:50 and 7:50 am weekdays. MMR is hosted by David Brancaccio.

Distributed by: American Public Media

Financial crises tend to come around every seven years — which means one may be overdue. We'll look at how Trump's treasury secretary pick, Steven Mnuchin, would handle a period of financial turmoil. Next, we'll explore how Dubai is using the sport of squash to cultivate relationships with major financial institutions. 

 

Bills in two states push to eliminate tenure

8 hours ago
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JaeRan Kim

If you want to stir up some disagreement when talking about higher education, just start talking about tenure, which essentially provides professors permanent employment. The subject has long been a source of controversy.  

Just weeks into 2017, two states have already introduced bills to eliminate tenure from public colleges and universities. Missouri’s proposed law would bar tenure for new professors hired starting next year. Iowa’s bill would eliminate tenure for all of its professors.

To advocates of tenure, its necessity is clear.

Why mud cracks on Mars matter

8 hours ago
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Mark Garrison

The Mars rover Curiosity recently discovered what may be mud cracks on the surface of the planet — evidence that water existed on Mars billion of years ago.

The rover examined what looked like “slabs of rock cross-hatched with shallow ridges,” in an area called “Old Soaker,” according to NASA. These could be the first mud cracks confirmed by Curiosity, but the rover previously found evidence of ancient lakes on Mars in 2015.

Single-parent families could see higher taxes under Trump

12 hours ago
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David Brancaccio

Who benefits and who loses when the federal tax system gets an overhaul?  

New York University professor Lily Batchelder has looked at how Trump's tax plan might affect the individual's pocketbook, finding that tax cuts for the wealthy could end up being proportionally larger than those for low- and middle-class families. 

Batchelder, also once the deputy director of the National Economic Council, joined us to break down what his plan means for different income brackets. 

The following transcript has been lightly edited. 

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Marketplace

Rick Perry is heading to Capitol Hill this morning for his Senate hearing on the role of energy secretary. We'll look at the issues that might come up during his session and then explain what the Energy Department actually does. Afterwards, we'll break down how Trump's tax plan will affect the country's different income brackets. 

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John Jenkins

Inside a giant glass cube in the Vanderbilt Hall of Grand Central Station, two world-ranked squash players are running, swatting, lunging and turning on a dime as fans and travelers look on. Behind the scenes in the VIP room, sponsors are sharing drinks and talking business.

Ziad Al-Turki is the chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and a self-described Squash Junkie.

“We all laugh that we’re not squash players we’re squash users,” Al-Turki said.

01/19/17: The history of Mars

13 hours ago
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Marketplace

Thousands are heading to Washington for Trump's inauguration — many of them to protest the event. Rally, a tech platform that connects riders with transportation to big events, is getting a lot of business right now thanks to anti-Trump activists. Co-founder Siheun Song explains how the service works. Next, we'll step outside of the planet to look at evidence from Mars rover Curiosity about possible mud cracks on the planet, which could tell us something about the possible history of life there. 

In one of its last acts, the Obama administration has contributed $500 million to a United Nations fund that will help developing countries deal with climate change. That brings the total contributed by the U.S. to $1 billion — which sounds like a lot. Is it?

The Obama administration last week launched a new allegation with the World Trade Organization against Chinese aluminum subsidies.  It accused Beijing of using cheap state-directed loans and subsidized energy to artificially expand its global market share.

No matter how this complaint turns out, it provides the president-elect another ready sledgehammer with which to batter China.

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Molly Wood

If you've ever traveled to Japan, you've probably been amazed by the fancy toilet seats. They are hyper-efficient and hyper-futuristic.

Toto is the best-known brand. But when tourists were surveyed in 2014, according to The Wall Street Journal, a quarter of foreign users said that they didn't understand the various buttons nor their respective functions on a typical Toto toilet.

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D Gorenstein

Congressman Tom Price, President-elect Donald Trump’s pick to head up the Department of Health and Human Services, faced his first Senate confirmation hearing today.

While he was light on the specifics of what the incoming Trump administration wants to replace Obamacare with, he did say, "I think health savings accounts and high-deductible catastrophic coverage are things that make a whole lot of sense  for many individuals, and we ought not force anybody to do anything. It ought to be a voluntary choice, but they ought to have the choice to be able to select them."

Companies try to avoid the Trump Twitter treatment

Jan 18, 2017

It's not even Inauguration Day yet, but we're getting a pretty clear sense of President-elect Donald Trump's negotiating style with corporate America. His tweets have chastised manufacturers like Carrier, GM and Ford for outsourcing jobs, prompting those companies to promise to add or retain jobs domestically. And now several others are promising expansions and investments before the Trump Tweet hammer falls.

01/18/2017: Union City has hope, but it needs jobs

Jan 18, 2017
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Marketplace

In a lot of ways, the story of Union City, Pennsylvania is the story of the 2016 presidential election. Folks there have lost hundreds of manufacturing jobs, and now they're waiting in hope for President-elect Donald Trump to follow through on his campaign promise to bring them back. Then, we look at high-deductible health care plans through a researcher who experimented on himself and risked heart failure in the process.

Union City: a town waiting on Trump's promises

Jan 18, 2017
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Marketplace

On Tuesday, we introduced you to Erie County, Pennsylvania, where constituents in November voted for a Republican presidential candidate for the first time since 1984.

It's the start of "The Big Promise," our yearlong reporting project based in Erie. What happens in a place where the economy's changing, manufacturing jobs have left and those voters are counting on the promises the president-elect made during the campaign?

Trade, Trump and the theater

Jan 18, 2017

Trump's nominee for Secretary of Commerce, billionaire investor Wilbur Ross, has a lot of opinions on trade. Philip Levy, from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, breaks down what the department actually does when it comes to that issue. Next, we'll talk about Trump's relationship with our currency and the markets. The U.S. dollar fell to its lowest level in weeks after he said it was too strong. Is volatility something we need to get used to? Plus: a look at Woody Harrelson's plan to direct and star in a livestreamed film called "Lost in London." 

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