Marketplace

Airs Weekdays at 6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In 30-minutes, Marketplace breaks down the day's business and economic news. With a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, the stories range from impacting your wallet to Wall Street. Marketplace Morning Report presents the morning business news at 5:50 and 7:50 am weekdays. MMR is hosted by David Brancaccio.

Distributed by: American Public Media

FIFA World Cup by the numbers

Jul 13, 2018

Croatia and France will battle for the title of best soccer team in the world on Sunday at 11 a.m. EST in the FIFA World Cup final. You can watch the game on Fox or Telemundo (if you're jonesing for those awesomely-elongated goal calls).  Many fans were hoping for an England vs. France final, but in an upset, Croatia beat England 2-1 in Wednesday's semifinal. And if you're an executive for one of the World Cup broadcasters, you were probably hoping for that final as well, because Croatia's not really a club that’s a household name.

What Big Macs can tell us about currencies around the world

Jul 13, 2018

We go through a lot of economic indicators on this program, but only one can claim to be the tastiest of them all: The Big Mac Index

Trump, on U.K. visit, blasts May's Brexit plan

Jul 13, 2018

British politicians from the left and right have condemned blunt comments on Brexit made by President Trump yesterday. The president is in the U.K. for his first official visit since taking office. In an interview with the tabloid newspaper "The Sun," Trump said Prime Minister Theresa May was "wrecking Brexit." He also cast doubt on the prospects for any bilateral trade deal between Britain and the U.S.

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The Big Mac Index

Jul 13, 2018

(U.S. Edition) President Trump visited the U.K. this week, leaving some very mixed messages. We'll discuss how the trip went, along with the British prime minister's push to snag a bilateral trade deal with the country. Afterwards, as part of Fed Chair Jerome Powell's first broadcast interview, we'll preview parts of his conversation with Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal, and then we'll talk to The Economist about its "Big Mac Index," which measures the difference between the price of a Big Mac in different countries to help us understand their currencies.

Trump dampens hope for U.K.-U.S. trade after Brexit

Jul 13, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Protesters have lined the streets in central London this morning to speak against President Trump’s visit to the capital. Prime Minister Theresa May was counting on support from her U.S. counterpart with Brexit negotiations reaching a crescendo, but overnight comments from the president might have squashed her hopes. Then, new figures released today show China’s trade surplus with the U.S. hit a record high last month. How much of that has to do with escalating trade tensions between the two nations?

Twitter is in a big game of "bot or not"

Jul 13, 2018

This week, Twitter announced that it's removing locked accounts from its platform. That's in an effort to clean up its bot problem. Bots are fake Twitter accounts that spread propaganda and intimidate people. A New York Times story in January suggested that up to 15 percent of Twitter's user base could be bots. Twitter says it was more like 5 percent. But now, as the company is trying to clean up the bot problem, some investors are worried that Twitter may have fewer human users than they thought. Kevin Roose follows social media for the New York Times.

Twitter is in a big game of "bot or not"

Jul 13, 2018

This week, Twitter announced that it's removing locked accounts from its platform. That's in an effort to clean up its bot problem. Bots are fake Twitter accounts that spread propaganda and intimidate people. A New York Times story in January suggested that up to 15 percent of Twitter's user base could be bots. Twitter says it was more like 5 percent.

China might be worried about an economic slowdown

Jul 13, 2018

(Markets Edition) China reported last month that it had a record trade surplus with the U. S. — another way of saying it had a record trade deficit with the country. But there were some other surprises buried deeper in the data, which we'll dive into on today's show. Afterwards, we'll discuss how Amazon's competitors have started hopping on the "Prime Day" bandwagon.

Jay Powell's been the chairman of the Federal Reserve for about five and a half months. His office in the Federal Reserve Building on Constitution Avenue is still getting put together, but he's already put his mark on the central bank and chatting with us today is part of that. We talked about transparency, trade disputes and stagnant wages, but he wasn't able to talk about inflation. The numbers came out just minutes after our conversation ended, and they showed consumer prices are growing faster year over year than they have since 2012.

How the Fed has changed

Jul 12, 2018

Things happen slowly at the Federal Reserve, and that includes changes in the culture. For most of its 104 year history, the Fed has been about as transparent as a fortress. Recent Fed chairs have pulled back the curtain a bit. But current Fed Chair Jerome Powell is trying to pick up the pace on transparency — within Fed limits, of course. Here’s a look at some of the Fed chairs who’ve managed to shift the culture at the central bank.  

Jerome 'Jay' Powell

His term: February 2018 — present

Full interview: Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell

Jul 12, 2018

In the five months since Jerome “Jay” Powell took over as chairman of the Federal Reserve, the country is facing a growing number of tests: stagnant wage growth, tariff disputes around the world and a White House that likes to publicly offer the Fed economic advice.

Costa Rica recently created a program to offer hormone replacement therapy for transgender people for free through its national universal health care system. Since the program started in fall of 2017 about 30 people have signed up. The government is expecting around 600 people to sign up. Officials are confident the hormone replacement therapy will be low cost for the country, and might actually defray future costs by keeping people out of the black market where they might fall victim to bad medicine and dirty needles.

Vanilla bean prices have been running between the equivalent of $1,000 and $1,200 dollars per pound, nearly five times what it was a few years ago. And that's rippling through the ice cream industry.  One key reason for the increased cost is last year's cyclone in leading vanilla producer Madagascar, which created a huge crop shortage. Larger ice cream companies, like Minnesota-based Kemps, a top-selling brand in the Upper Midwest, are having to make some adjustments.

A crisis in the vanilla economy

Jul 12, 2018

(Markets Edition) Over the next few days, the country's biggest banks are gearing up to report their earnings for the most recent quarter — and expectations are high. We'll look at why analysts are anticipating strong earnings. Afterwards, we'll discuss how investors are starting to ask for higher returns in the short term from the government — a potential sign of a recession. Then finally, we'll talk about the rising price of vanilla, which is forcing some players in the ice cream world to make adjustments.

In the five months since Jerome “Jay” Powell took over as chairman of the Federal Reserve, the country is facing a growing number of tests: stagnant wage growth, tariff disputes around the world and a White House that likes to publicly offer the Fed economic advice.

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