Marketplace

Airs Weekdays at 6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In 30-minutes, Marketplace breaks down the day's business and economic news. With a reporting style that is lively and unexpected, the stories range from impacting your wallet to Wall Street. Marketplace Morning Report presents the morning business news at 5:50 and 7:50 am weekdays. MMR is hosted by David Brancaccio.

Distributed by: American Public Media

(U.S. Edition) With the China and the U.S. constantly going back and forth about trade, we'll take a look at how U.S. businesses in China are feeling about escalating tensions. Afterwards, we'll discuss what the United States' increase in oil production means for U.S. consumers, and then we'll explore how Costa Rica has created a program to offer hormone replacement therapy for transgender people.

Crunch day for Brexit

Jul 12, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … After a stormy week of resignations, the British government is about to publish its latest proposals for exiting the European Union. Will this blueprint deliver the promised "comprehensive vision" to businesses craving a clear direction? We hear from the new Brexit secretary, Dominic Raab, and Adam Marshall, director general of the British Chambers of Commerce. Also in this edition: as President Trump begins his first official visit to the U.K., the BBC's Anu Anand finds out whether he can expect to receive a warm welcome.

Yes, lots of people are still playing "Pokemon Go"

Jul 12, 2018

This page was updated on July 12. 

The summer of 2016.

It may not be the most notable summer in history, but it was most definitely a special summer for some people after the release of Pokémon Go.

For those of you who didn’t happen across the phenomenon that swept the globe like wildfire, Niantic’s Pokémon Go brought the world of Pokémon into the hands of millions of smartphone users across the world through the use of augmented reality.

Yes, lots of people are still playing "Pokemon Go"

Jul 12, 2018

"Pokemon Go" was one of 2016’s most popular mobile games, but it seemed to lose players just as quickly as it gained them. That may have been due to some technical glitches, but "Pokemon Go" appears to be back. That's at least in part thanks to some new social features. Those are what got Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood back in the game, and got her thinking about who else is playing "Pokemon Go."

More Americans are quitting their jobs nowadays, according to the latest numbers out from the Labor Department. The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) shows that in May, the “quits rate” hit its highest level in 17 years.  That means that in some sectors, workers feel good enough about the economy to leave a job and take a chance on a new gig. And some workers are finding they may be rewarded for changing jobs, in this low unemployment, low wage-growth environment, with better pay or other perks.

NATO's IOUs

Jul 11, 2018

If you thought all the Chinese trade talk was testy, you should see footage from President Donald Trump's first day of North Atlantic Treaty Organization meetings today. Trump slammed American allies, saying "many countries owe us a tremendous amount of money" from years of defense spending. And that was just the photo op. We'll fill you in on the NATO meeting and what to expect during the next few days of talks in Brussels. Plus, the latest on those tariffs.

The phone call that lowered Pfizer drug prices

Jul 11, 2018

(Markets Edition) Pfizer has reversed its big price increase following pressure from Trump and his administration. We'll discuss some of the reasons why they may have taken heed of the government's words, and why there could still be a catch. Afterwards, we'll explore how the trade war affects banks, and then we'll talk about a potential bilateral trade deal between the U.S. and the U.K.

Residents of Puerto Rico are expressing relief that Hurricane Beryl has weakened as it sweeps over the island. But Puerto Rico is still recovering from last year’s hurricanes as more crop up in the Caribbean. One suggestion for how the island should prepare and react to natural disasters? Incorporate the private sector.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

China vows retaliation for $200 billion U.S. tariff threat

Jul 11, 2018

The Chinese government vowed Wednesday to take “firm and forceful measures” against U.S. threats to expand tariff hikes to thousands of products like fish sticks, apples and French doors as their trade dispute escalates.

China gave no details but earlier threatened “comprehensive measures” if Washington took more action. That prompted fears Beijing, running out of imports for retaliation due to its lopsided trade balance with the U.S., might try to disrupt operations of American automakers, retailers and others that see China as a key market.

The trade war is getting bigger

Jul 11, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The trade war between the U.S. and China is escalating. The Trump administration has published an additional list of $200 billion worth of Chinese goods that it wants to hit with tariffs. We'll discuss China's response to this list, and the change in the types of products that we're hitting with penalties. Afterwards, we'll look at how some U.S.-China deals are staying on track, despite all this trade turmoil. Tesla is building its first factory outside of the U.S. in Shanghai.

In early June 2018, the Social Security Trustees board reported that the Social Security Trust Funds — a main source of funding for Social Security benefits aggregated from Social Security taxes — would be depleted by 2034, one year sooner than previously estimated in last year's report. According to the trustees, factors that would contribute to this increased depletion are general increases in the cost of living expenses like health care costs. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … A fresh list of potential Chinese tariff targets from the U.S. this morning is sending global markets solidly lower. China says it’s “shocked” by the measures. So what’s included and when could they go into effect? Then, President Trump is at the NATO meeting in Brussels today. While he’s criticized Germany for not contributing enough to the alliance’s defense budget, the meeting has big implications for trade, too. Afterward, it’s a big night for England as its team makes a semi-final appearance in the World Cup.

Tesla's China plant will serve the world's biggest electric car market

Jul 11, 2018

China is a huge market for electric cars. Tesla is looking for a place to build and sell lots of electric cars. But the U.S. is in a trade war with China and right now there's about a 40 percent tax on American-made cars being sold in China. That hurts all automakers, but if you're trying to become the dominant electric car maker in the world you need to sell cars in China. This week Tesla said it will open a plant in Shanghai to eventually build 500,000 cars a year without the import taxes.

China is a huge market for electric cars. Tesla is looking for a place to build and sell lots of electric cars. But the U.S. is in a trade war with China and right now there's about a 40 percent tax on American-made cars being sold in China. That hurts all automakers, but if you're trying to become the dominant electric car maker in the world you need to sell cars in China. Dan Sperling is the founding director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis.

Donald Trump's choice of Brett Kavanaugh to be the next Supreme Court Justice may have contained an element of surprise. But there's nothing surprising about what happens next. Ads. Millions and millions of dollars worth of ads on television and the internet aimed at influencing those who have the power to influence whether or not Kavanaugh gets the black robe.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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