Act 10

Andy Stenz

President Donald Trump wants to slash the federal workforce, according to the Washington Post. It reports that Trump is preparing to announce the biggest cuts in decades, believing the government employs too many people -- wasting taxpayers' money.

Andy Stenz

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker says he has spoken with Vice President Mike Pence about how the new Trump administration could apply parts of Act 10 to federal employees.

Joe Brusky, flickr

It was five years ago that the controversial legislation known as Act 10 went into effect. The law sharply curtails collective bargaining rights for public employees in Wisconsin. Supporters said it was aimed at giving local governments and school districts more flexibility in hiring – or firing, and more control in various measures of quality.

Little Creek Press

This interview originally aired, March 24, 2016. 

Former Democratic State Senator Tim Cullen has had a close-up view of Wisconsin politics for a longtime. The Janesville native worked in politics for many years.

Originally, Cullen had hoped to become a high school social studies teacher, but once he started working for former Congressman Les Aspen, he found himself drawn to politics. After jobs ranging from congressional staff to State Senate Majority Leader to Republican Governor Tommy Thompson's cabinet, Cullen worked outside of politics for 20 years.

Bob Bach

Wisconsin made history five years ago when Gov. Scott Walker signed Act 10 into law. It stripped most public unions of collective bargaining rights and sparked massive protests at the State Capitol. We examine whether the law accomplished its stated mission to save taxpayer money, and perhaps an unstated goal – to weaken the political power of unions.

Gov. Walker unveiled Act 10 in February of 2011. He said Wisconsin needed to end its tradition of collective bargaining with most public workers.

Andy Stenz

Gov. Scott Walker sparked outcry in a news conference February 11, 2011. That's when he announced Act 10. It ended public union rights, except the ability to bargain for limited wage increases. Fire and police unions were spared.

"We have to reform the wage and benefit process here in the state of Wisconsin," Walker said.

Walker argued for Act 10, saying it would help the state control spending and reduce debt.

Marti Mikkelson

Unions in Wisconsin are bracing for another battle.

Andy Stenz

The president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees says it “has a score to settle” with Gov. Scott Walker.

Barack Obama will be back in Milwaukee on Monday.

Vox Efx, flickr

Wisconsin’s primary elections are next Tuesday.  But it will be the general election in November that many believe will effectively be a referendum, another one, on the course Scott Walker has set as governor of Wisconsin.

Gov. Scott Walker
Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Wisconsin Supreme Court upheld two divisive state laws on Thursday.

A federal appeals court has upheld Gov. Scott Walker's bill that strips public unions of collective bargaining rights.

Two unions representing city of Madison and Dane County workers filed a lawsuit in 2011, alleging the law violated their right to free assembly and equal protection.

U.S. District Judge William Conley found the restrictions constitutional last year. 

Andy Stenz

Tuesday marks the third anniversary of Gov. Walker signing Act 10 into law, restricting public unions.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court listened to arguments Monday over whether Act 10 is unconstitutional.

The state Supreme Court will hear arguments Monday in yet another challenge to Act 10.  The law dismantled most collective bargaining rights for most public workers, more than two years ago.

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