Charlottesville

Aisha Turner

On Saturday, Milwaukeeans rallied in response to the racial violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. A large group spread out at the end of Wisconsin Avenue and chanted “white silence is violence” … “love trumps hate” … and “black lives matter.” 

They stood between the Northwestern Mutual Tower and the orange sunburst sculpture in O’Donnell Park. Some cars passing by honked in support.

"So this week it's Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson's coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop? ... [Jefferson] was a major slave owner. Are we going to take down his statue?" — President Trump, Aug. 15, 2017

Updated at 7:26 p.m. ET

In a stunning reversal from comments he made just one day prior, President Trump said on Tuesday "there's blame on both sides" for the violence in Charlottesville, Va.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Almost 48 hours after violence engulfed Charlottesville, Va., President Trump called out white nationalist groups by name. Trump's remarks on Monday followed criticism that his initial statement about the clash of protesters did not condemn racist groups specifically.

One day after deadly unrest roiled Charlottesville, Va., its effects have sent ripples through cities across the United States. Demonstrators from New York City to Seattle organized rallies Sunday to condemn the white nationalist groups that had descended on the Virginia city this weekend.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

A day after a rally of white nationalists turned violent in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said there is "no place" for such hateful people in the United States as he called on President Trump to more strongly condemn the perpetrators.

Updated at 7:52 p.m. ET

A man who appeared to be protesting Saturday with a group of self-proclaimed fascists is accused of killing a woman and injuring multiple others by driving his car into a crowd of marchers in Charlottesville, Va.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

One day after a car plowed into a group of people protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., the victim of that attack has been identified as Heather Heyer. The Charlottesville resident was 32 years old.

Two state troopers, Pilot Lt. H. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates, also died Saturday, when their helicopter crashed en route to the scene of the violence. Dozens of other people were treated for injuries throughout the day, including 19 from the car crash.

Updated Aug. 13 at 10:50 a.m. ET

Political leaders used Twitter to respond to the violent confrontations that began Friday night in Charlottesville, Va.; continued with a "Unite the Right" rally that pitted members of the alt-right, Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi groups against anti-racism counterprotesters on Saturday; and turned deadly when a car plowed into a group of pedestrians.