election

Democrat Michelle Frankard of Wisconsin voted for President Trump, and she's hoping she won't regret it.

At the Garden of Eatin', a bustling diner in picturesque Galesville, Frankard is having breakfast with her adopted father, Ken Horton. A dozen shiny electric guitars line the walls, each next to a black-and-white framed poster with the likes of Johnny Cash and Janis Joplin. The deep-seated booths host a variety of regulars and those just passing through.

Incumbent Tony Evers and former Whitnall Superintendent Lowell Holtz will continue to vie for the job of Wisconsin's Superintendent of Public Instruction, with the general Election set for April 4. 

Rachel Morello

If you think about it, an election is sort of like a job interview: candidates present their ideas, hoping the public will hire them.

The three men campaigning to be Wisconsin’s superintendent are nearing the end of the “first round interview,” ahead of next week’s primary.

But rather than surveying voters, we assembled a “hiring committee” – of students!

On February 21, Wisconsin voters will narrow the field of candidates for state Superintendent of Public Instruction. Three men are vying for the job.

So, let’s get to know them.

Tony Evers says his work is a long way from finished.

“Have we solved every problem? Absolutely not,” says Evers, who has led Wisconsin schools for the last eight years. “We still need to make sure that we bring people together.”

Have you noticed that you’re not seeing many ads for the upcoming Wisconsin Supreme Court election? That’s because only one person is running – the incumbent. 

Conservative-leaning Justice Annette Ziegler has no challenger this spring – it means she’s virtually assured of another ten year term on the court.

Updated at 9:24 a.m. ET on Wednesday

Top U.S. intelligence officials have briefed leaders in Washington about an explosive — but unverified — document that alleges collusion between Russia and President-elect Donald Trump, NPR has learned.

The brief, which NPR has seen but not independently verified, was given by Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain to FBI Director James Comey on Dec. 9. Details from it have been part of presentations by Comey and other intelligence leaders to Trump, President Obama and key leaders in Congress.

Marti Mikkelson

At the state Capitol on Monday, a couple hundred people packed into a tiny hearing room, while the state's 10 Republican electors took their seats at the front.

They selected Brad Courtney of the state Republican Party to lead the proceedings. He laid out the ground rules: “No signs are allowed in the meeting. Please keep conversation to a minimum. If there are any loud conversations or disruptions, we ask that you please take those outside.” But, all wasn’t quiet, after a clerk distributed ballots, the electors voted, and Courtney read the results.

althouse

Update: Dec. 19, 12:35 P.M.

While demonstrators marched and shouted, Wisconsin's 10 presidential electors cast their ballots for Donald Trump, during the noon hour at the state Capitol on Monday. Police escorted one protester out of the voting room, after she yelled, "This is my America. You sold us out." A contingent of demonstrators chanted, "Shame." Trump carried Wisconsin by nearly 23,000 votes, becoming the first Republican to win the state's presidential vote in decades.

Original story from Dec. 19, 6:00 A.M.

President Obama says the United States will respond to Russian cyberattacks that the intelligence community has concluded were part of an effort to influence the 2016 presidential election.

Marti Mikkelson

Update, Dec. 12 3:30 P.M.

The Wisconsin Election Commission has certified the state's recount of its presidential election and reports that Republican Donald Trump actually won the state with 131 more votes than the initial tally indicated. The recount also indicated that there were no major flaws that affected the Wisconsin count, although workers did have to toss or change hundreds of votes because of errors detected.

Updated at 1:49 p.m. ET Saturday with confirmation from the U.S. official and comments from Sen. Ron Wyden

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET Saturday with comments from Sen. Angus King

The CIA has concluded that Russia intervened in the 2016 election specifically to help Donald Trump win the presidency, a U.S. official has confirmed to NPR.

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

President-Elect Donald Trump is planning a return visit to Wisconsin, as part of his "thank you" tour of several states that were battlegrounds during the presidential campaign.  

Trump has scheduled a stop at State Fair Park in West Allis on Tuesday night. Vice President-Elect Mike Pence is expected to join him. 

Trump won Wisconsin by about 22,000 votes, becoming the first Republican presidential candidate to win the state since 1984.  

Michelle Maternowski

Update, Dec. 2, 4:08 P.M.

A federal court in Madison will not temporarily halt the Wisconsin recount, while opponents challenge it. U.S. District Judge James Peterson will let both the recount and the legal challenge proceed simultaneously. He rejected a motion from Trump supporters to halt the process, stating that there is no harm in allowing the recount to continue. Peterson has scheduled a court hearing on their lawsuit for Dec. 9, just four days before the state's final vote tally is due.   

Update, Dec. 2:

Michelle Maternowski

Wisconsin begins its historic presidential recount Thursday. Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate who requested the recount, didn't do so until late last week. So election officials have been scrambling to prepare for the big task. Federal guidelines require a final vote count by Dec. 13, less than two weeks from now.

Hundreds of municipalities and counties were still putting final touches on their plans on Wednesday. The Wisconsin Elections Commission held a lengthy teleconference to provide answers.

Update, Nov. 29, 10:10 P.M.

Dane County Judge Valerie Bailey-Rihn will not mandate a hand recount of presidential ballots in Wisconsin. Therefore Wisconsin clerks can decide how their counties will recount their ballots, whether by hand or computer. The judge has determined that attorneys representing Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein have not provided evidence that voting machines here were likely tampered with, necessitating a hand recount. Stein had wanted the ballots checked, by hand, not just re-fed into machines.    

Pages