election

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In a referendum that is advisory only, Milwaukee County voters turned thumbs down to the idea of an expanded vehicle registration fee. The county just enacted its first, in 2017.

Last fall, County Executive Chris Abele included a $60 wheel tax in his 2017 county budget. The County Board approved half - a $30 tax, but also put the bigger question on Tuesday's ballot. Voters rejected the idea, 72%-28%.

Tony Evers, Facebook

Incumbent state schools Superintendent Tony Evers brushed back a challenge by Lowell Holtz to win a third term, by a 70%-30% margin. Evers campaigned as a strong proponent of public schools, of substantially boosting funding for them and addressing their teacher shortage and of providing mental health services for students.

The projected winners of Wisconsin's Tuesday, April 4, 2017 Spring Election are marked in bold.

STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Tony Evers, incumbent
Lowell Holtz

>> More on Evers' victory.

MILWAUKEE COUNTY RACES

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 47 (Incumbent John Siefert did not run)
Scott Wales
Kristy Yang

There’s an election next Tuesday, and one of the contested races is for an open seat in Milwaukee County Circuit Court.

The Branch 47 race is between Fox Point Municipal Judge Scott Wales and Attorney Kristy Yang.

Rachel Morello

With just one week left until election day, the candidates for state superintendent presented their cases in Milwaukee on Tuesday. Incumbent Tony Evers and challenger Lowell Holtz spoke in front of a crowd at Marquette Law School.  

The two men talk differently about a variety of issues – including school choice. But they agree on this: the state must do more to boost Milwaukee’s public schools.

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Live NPR coverage of the House Intelligence Committee’s public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Democrat Michelle Frankard of Wisconsin voted for President Trump, and she's hoping she won't regret it.

At the Garden of Eatin', a bustling diner in picturesque Galesville, Frankard is having breakfast with her adopted father, Ken Horton. A dozen shiny electric guitars line the walls, each next to a black-and-white framed poster with the likes of Johnny Cash and Janis Joplin. The deep-seated booths host a variety of regulars and those just passing through.

Incumbent Tony Evers and former Whitnall Superintendent Lowell Holtz will continue to vie for the job of Wisconsin's Superintendent of Public Instruction, with the general Election set for April 4. 

Rachel Morello

If you think about it, an election is sort of like a job interview: candidates present their ideas, hoping the public will hire them.

The three men campaigning to be Wisconsin’s superintendent are nearing the end of the “first round interview,” ahead of next week’s primary.

But rather than surveying voters, we assembled a “hiring committee” – of students!

Incumbent Tony Evers will face off with challenger Lowell Holtz for the position of state Superintendent. 

The two men won the most votes in February's primary race. Wisconsin voters will make their final decision during the general election on Tuesday, April 4. 

Get to know more about the remaining candidates below...

Original post: February 15, 2017

Have you noticed that you’re not seeing many ads for the upcoming Wisconsin Supreme Court election? That’s because only one person is running – the incumbent. 

Conservative-leaning Justice Annette Ziegler has no challenger this spring – it means she’s virtually assured of another ten year term on the court.

Updated at 9:24 a.m. ET on Wednesday

Top U.S. intelligence officials have briefed leaders in Washington about an explosive — but unverified — document that alleges collusion between Russia and President-elect Donald Trump, NPR has learned.

The brief, which NPR has seen but not independently verified, was given by Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain to FBI Director James Comey on Dec. 9. Details from it have been part of presentations by Comey and other intelligence leaders to Trump, President Obama and key leaders in Congress.

Marti Mikkelson

At the state Capitol on Monday, a couple hundred people packed into a tiny hearing room, while the state's 10 Republican electors took their seats at the front.

They selected Brad Courtney of the state Republican Party to lead the proceedings. He laid out the ground rules: “No signs are allowed in the meeting. Please keep conversation to a minimum. If there are any loud conversations or disruptions, we ask that you please take those outside.” But, all wasn’t quiet, after a clerk distributed ballots, the electors voted, and Courtney read the results.

althouse

Update: Dec. 19, 12:35 P.M.

While demonstrators marched and shouted, Wisconsin's 10 presidential electors cast their ballots for Donald Trump, during the noon hour at the state Capitol on Monday. Police escorted one protester out of the voting room, after she yelled, "This is my America. You sold us out." A contingent of demonstrators chanted, "Shame." Trump carried Wisconsin by nearly 23,000 votes, becoming the first Republican to win the state's presidential vote in decades.

Original story from Dec. 19, 6:00 A.M.

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