Emerald ash borer

It has been almost thirteen years since an invasive beetle revealed its metallic-green-shelled self to scientists outside Detroit. Since then, emerald ash borer (or EAB) has killed tens of millions of ash trees in Michigan alone and has moved on to 23 other states and two Canadian provinces.

Wisconsin isn't new to the list. EAB was first reported here back in August 1, 2008.

Over the years, WUWM has been checking in with scientists and foresters in our neck of the woods to learn how they deal with the threat of EAB.

R Venette

Arctic weather conditions have been hard on us humans in recent days, but there might be positive impacts when it comes to curbing unwelcome bugs.

Earlier this week on Lake Effect, the U.S. Forest Service’s regional forester said that invasive species are one of the agency’s most significant issues today. One of them - Emerald ash borer (EAB) continues to spread throughout southeastern Wisconsin.

U.S. Forest Service

As the weather gets nicer, millions of Americans will take to hiking in national forests, trading in the company of man for the company of trees. But as more people take advantage of forests, the increased foot-traffic may actually pose a threat to these natural resources.