employment

Rachel Morello

What do you want to be when you grow up? Gender might determine what images come to kids’ minds.

So many fields are dominated by one gender or another that Wisconsin has a name for this trend: “non-traditional occupations.” Those are fields that employ 25 percent or less of one gender. The state keeps track, and publishes a list every few years.

Leaders at schools like MATC say it’s their mission to shorten that list.

Micaela Martin

In Wisconsin, the gender wage gap is 22 cents per dollar, according to the National Partnership for Women and Families. This adds up. American women are losing up to $1.5 million over the course of their lifetimes. A program at UWM is hoping to make wages more equal by teaching future graduates how to negotiate with employers.

We've written a lot about the link between college and the workforce — and the kinds of skills graduates will need in the 21st century to succeed. One of the skills you need is knowing how to present yourself. To put your best foot forward in the workplace, and in life.

The U.S. House has voted to scrap a recent Dept. of Labor regulation, to the delight of Governor Scott Walker. For some time, he has wanted Wisconsin to drug test laid-off workers who apply for unemployment insurance, but Walker says the Obama administration set narrow circumstances in which states can drug test UI applicants, such as, if the person's occupation requires a firearm.

Update, Nov. 23: Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel is praising a federal court in Texas for issuing a nationwide preliminary injunction to halt the Dept. of Labor's Overtime Rule. Schimel, representing Wisconsin, had joined 20 other states in asking the court to put the rule on hold. "There’s no greater honor than representing millions of Wisconsinites in the continuous fight for the return of power to our citizens, away from an out-of-control federal bureaucracy in Washington D.C.

With just over a week before it was scheduled to take effect, a federal judge has blocked the implementation of an Obama administration rule that would have extended overtime eligibility to some 4 million Americans.

The Labor Department's sweeping overhaul to the overtime rule required employers to pay time-and-a-half to their employees who worked more than 40 hours in a given week and earned less than $47,476 a year.

Marti Mikkelson

After unrest rocked Milwaukee in August - following the police killing of a black man, Gov. Walker promised to send mobile job banks to distressed city neighborhoods. Many are plagued by joblessness and crime.

On Tuesday, the first traveling unit arrived. It set up a bank of computers on 27th and North, inside the Dept. of Workforce Development. Several dozen people came in to take advantage of the services.

Jerry Grover sat in a corner of the Hire Center, searching for jobs on a laptop.

Bonnie Petrie

When Governor Walker last week announced the state would spend more than $4 million to spur workforce development on the north side, he said some of the money will pay for mobile response job centers to set up in zip codes where unemployment is high and access to resources is limited. 

Bonnie Petrie

Governor Scott Walker was in Milwaukee Friday morning to announce the state would be injecting an infusion of cash into efforts to improve economic conditions on the north side.

The governor promised $4.5 million he says will help pay for a variety of job training programs, mobile job centers in neighborhoods with high unemployment rates and to rehab or raze abandoned homes and businesses in economically distressed neighborhoods.  

City of Milwaukee (Department of City Development)

Could jobs be headed to Milwaukee's north side? A local businessman is hopeful, and he’s talking with others.

Tim Sullivan used to lead South Milwaukee giant Bucyrus, a mining manufacturer. Now he's CEO of REV Group, a firm headquartered in Milwaukee, which makes ambulances, buses, street sweepers and a range of other vehicles.

REV Group has bid on a contract with the United States Postal Service to build vans.

Sullivan says the city's north side would be the perfect place to do the work because of the area's huge labor pool.

Marti Mikkelson

Elected officials and community activists gathered in Milwaukee on Tuesday to criticize Gov. Walker’s job creation agency. They insist it has not done enough to fuel economic development in the Sherman Park neighborhood. 

Violence broke out there this month, after an officer fatally shot a man who police say was armed and fleeing a traffic stop. But, activists did not limit their criticism to just the state.

michaeljung, fotolia

Tens of thousands of graduates are either entering the workforce or searching for their place in it.

And if you're a new grad looking for a job, these may be some of the best words you'll hear this spring:

"There will be an increase that pretty much brings us back to the levels of employment for recent grads that occurred before the recession."

That's Jean Salzer, director of UWM's Career Planning & Resource Center. She’s talking about predictions from the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Fotolia

The term millennial is thrown around so frequently that many may not know who is and isn't a millennial. It's used pretty generally to mean a young person, and it doesn't really have a strict definition, which has been confusing for some. 

Sean Hagen / Flickr

Some cities around the country have found a way to connect unemployed and underemployed people with work by requiring a certain number of them be hired for public works projects and other developments made possible through public dollars.

Milwaukee has one of those programs, called the Residents Preference Program, or RPP.

Milwaukee's program has been around for more than two decades. But in recent years, criticism has been leveled that RPP has not had the level of success many had hoped for it.

How to Find the Work You Were Meant to Do

Nearly all of us in the workforce have likely, at one time or another, paused to ask ourselves: is this job really what I want to do with my life? Writer Chris Guillebeau thinks it’s a question that’s important to ask.

Guillebeau’s latest book, Born for This, leads readers to consider figuring out what their dream job actually is and what it could take to get there.

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