essay

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Many of our social media feeds are lighting up with news of where this year’s high school seniors have decided to go to college next year.  It’s an exciting time for them, but - as Lake Effect essayist Jessie Garcia can attest - a stressful time for their parents:

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There are many interesting biographies you can find in the neighborhood library or bookstore. They often share a side of famous people we didn’t know or appreciate. Lake Effect essayist Mark Siegrist says there are two that should be on your radar screen.

I love reading biographies.

Sometimes they can be dry. But often they contain golden nuggets about favorite personalities that make you stop and think… Really?

It happened to me recently while paging through separate stories about a couple of big names.

Essay: The Idea

Apr 18, 2017
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Milwaukee native Lauren Groh is in the process of through-hiking the Appalachian Trail. In this essay, she explains what prompted her to attempt the journey:

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This week, US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson traveled to Russia. His mission was to convince the Putin administration to back off from its support of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who is accused of using poison gas on his own citizens as that country’s civil war continues.

Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says those accusations greatly escalate the stakes in Syria:

Essay: History at Age 13

Apr 12, 2017
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Andrew McCarthy writes about that pivotal age, when you just want to know how your life will turn out.  Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler thinks it’s important to consider history through the eyes of someone who can appreciate the passage of time:

If the study of economics is called the dismal science, the study of history must run a close second. According to the American Council of Trustees, history is so dismal that only 18% of colleges require a course in either history or government.

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Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler has been thinking about how we understand each other - or fail to. We’ll let him explain...

It is a natural tendency in this complicated world to simplify, and one way is to divide everything into two separate camps, winners and losers, players and spectators, southerners and northerners and on and on. But I’m not touching Republicans and Democrats. If what passes for political discourse continues, I’m investing my money in the dueling pistol business.

Essay: Rooting Down

Mar 24, 2017
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Spring officially began earlier this week, and the weather - for a few days this week - reflected the change of season.  Regardless of what the last few days of March look and feel like, Lake Effect essayist Meagan Schultz says this time of year is important:

Essay: A Backpack Named Zoe

Mar 18, 2017
Image courtesy of Lauren Groh

The Appalachian Trail runs 2,190 miles from Georgia all the way to the summit of Mount Katahdin in Maine. It takes months to complete and a good amount of preparation for novice and experienced hikers alike.

Milwaukee native Lauren Groh is embarking on that journey soon, and she is busy preparing all supplies she will need on the trail:

A Milwaukee Judge's Perspective on Segregation

Mar 10, 2017
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Merriam-Webster defines the word “segregate” in two ways: “to separate or set apart from others or from the general mass,” and “to cause or force the separation of (as from the rest of society).” It defines “segregation” as the act of segregating; it gives a secondary definition of “segregation” as “the separation or isolation of a race, class or ethnic group by enforced of voluntary residence in a restricted area . . . .”

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Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler has lived in Wisconsin for a while now. But while he calls the state home, he does not think of Brookfield as his hometown.

Nearly 80 years ago, John Steinbeck wrote “The Grapes of Wrath” about the uprooting of farmers from the dustbowl to the promised land of California. Time moves on, things change. The Model A Ford has been replaced by the airplane and the moving van, and migration is now corporate relocation. But the basics are still the same, to follow the economic crops across the country in search of a better life.

Essay: Truth

Feb 22, 2017
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One person’s climate change data is another person’s fake news.  Lake Effect essayist and former journalist Avi Lank recently considered his relationship with truth:

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Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis was recently confirmed as Secretary of Defense. Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says Mattis’ military background is a plus in his new job.

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Parenting is not always an easy task.  In fact, it’s often not an easy task.  Still, whether you are a parent, or you think back on when you were parented, it’s a lesson worth remembering.

Almost every morning, I wake up and head to my meditation mat. And every morning, I say the same thing.

“Today I will be calm. Today I will not yell. Today I will breathe deeply. Today I will not let a three-year-old infuriate me. Today I will be calm.”

And every evening, when my husband returns home and takes over, I say the same thing.

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Regardless of your political view on income disparity in this country, the truth remains that there are haves and have-nots in our society.  Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler says the have-nots have occupied a little more of his thinking recently:

Winston Churchill once remarked that the game of golf was, in his words, “a good walk ruined.”

Essay: Stuff a Sock In It

Jan 21, 2017
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If you were an alien on vacation to earth, you’d be forgiven for thinking humans never shut up. We talk all the time: right here on radio and on television, on our smartphones, to each other.

Like most of us, Lake Effect essayist Joanne Weintraub is guilty of talking too much. But she’s trying to cut it out:

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