essay

Essay: Rooting Down

Mar 24, 2017
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Spring officially began earlier this week, and the weather - for a few days this week - reflected the change of season.  Regardless of what the last few days of March look and feel like, Lake Effect essayist Meagan Schultz says this time of year is important:

Essay: A Backpack Named Zoe

Mar 18, 2017
Image courtesy of Lauren Groh

The Appalachian Trail runs 2,190 miles from Georgia all the way to the summit of Mount Katahdin in Maine. It takes months to complete and a good amount of preparation for novice and experienced hikers alike.

Milwaukee native Lauren Groh is embarking on that journey soon, and she is busy preparing all supplies she will need on the trail:

A Milwaukee Judge's Perspective on Segregation

Mar 10, 2017
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Merriam-Webster defines the word “segregate” in two ways: “to separate or set apart from others or from the general mass,” and “to cause or force the separation of (as from the rest of society).” It defines “segregation” as the act of segregating; it gives a secondary definition of “segregation” as “the separation or isolation of a race, class or ethnic group by enforced of voluntary residence in a restricted area . . . .”

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Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler has lived in Wisconsin for a while now. But while he calls the state home, he does not think of Brookfield as his hometown.

Nearly 80 years ago, John Steinbeck wrote “The Grapes of Wrath” about the uprooting of farmers from the dustbowl to the promised land of California. Time moves on, things change. The Model A Ford has been replaced by the airplane and the moving van, and migration is now corporate relocation. But the basics are still the same, to follow the economic crops across the country in search of a better life.

Essay: Truth

Feb 22, 2017
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One person’s climate change data is another person’s fake news.  Lake Effect essayist and former journalist Avi Lank recently considered his relationship with truth:

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Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis was recently confirmed as Secretary of Defense. Lake Effect essayist Art Cyr says Mattis’ military background is a plus in his new job.

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Parenting is not always an easy task.  In fact, it’s often not an easy task.  Still, whether you are a parent, or you think back on when you were parented, it’s a lesson worth remembering.

Almost every morning, I wake up and head to my meditation mat. And every morning, I say the same thing.

“Today I will be calm. Today I will not yell. Today I will breathe deeply. Today I will not let a three-year-old infuriate me. Today I will be calm.”

And every evening, when my husband returns home and takes over, I say the same thing.

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Regardless of your political view on income disparity in this country, the truth remains that there are haves and have-nots in our society.  Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler says the have-nots have occupied a little more of his thinking recently:

Winston Churchill once remarked that the game of golf was, in his words, “a good walk ruined.”

Essay: Stuff a Sock In It

Jan 21, 2017
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If you were an alien on vacation to earth, you’d be forgiven for thinking humans never shut up. We talk all the time: right here on radio and on television, on our smartphones, to each other.

Like most of us, Lake Effect essayist Joanne Weintraub is guilty of talking too much. But she’s trying to cut it out:

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One of the concerns on many people’s minds is what will happen to the Affordable Care Act. Lake Effect essayist Avi Lank is one of them:

As plans to repeal and replace Obamacare pick up steam, historically minded Republicans are thinking about the bloody shirt - no, not a medical bloody shirt, but a political one. For decades after the Civil War, the Republican Party used "waiving the bloody shirt" as a sure-fire device for winning presidential elections.

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The classic images of Christmas so often include food: families sitting serenely around a table filled with food; Santa Claus, climbing down the chimney with a picturesque plate of cookies awaiting him.

For some, these familiar scenes set the standard for the ideal Christmas experience. But as Lake Effect essayist Meagan Schultz explains, real life doesn’t often imitate art.

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Have you sent out your holiday cards yet? Many of us have or will send out cards that comprise a photo collage from the past year. There are dozens of websites that let you put them together with fairly little effort. That’s meant that fewer of us are sending the long update letter along with our holiday cards. But, as essayist Jim Spangler points out, they haven’t gone away entirely.

Essay: Deck the Halls

Dec 19, 2016
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If you make that trip out to the mall or the game store or wherever you buy your gifts, you might well be confronted by that ubiquitous phenomenon this time of year - Christmas music, played over whatever speakers are at hand.  You might think Lake Effect essayist Joanne Weintraub would be unhappy about that - but you’d be wrong:

If I were small enough to sit comfortably on Santa's lap, which I assure you I am not, I'd have only one thing on my Christmas list. It's not a toy, not even the $80,000 automotive kind that big girls and boys like. No, it's a wish.

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The intersection of history, memory, and flavor are on the mind of Lake Effect essayist Cari Taylor-Carlson. 

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Are you going home for Christmas this year?  Or are you at home, looking forward to the day that someone else will be coming home for Christmas?  Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler believes there’s more to coming home for Christmas than simply bridging some distance:

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