Gov. Scott Walker

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Gov. Walker is bringing in a heavy hitter to help him raise campaign money – President Trump. He’s scheduled to host an event Tuesday for the governor in southeastern Wisconsin.

Walker says he’s thrilled the president is coming here, even though Trump remains embroiled in a probe into possible ties with Russia. And, even though the two leaders have a rocky history.

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There’s been continued speculation on who might challenge Gov. Scott Walker in 2018. Walker has indicated that if he will run for a third term, he’ll announce this summer.

Since the beginning of the year, a number of well-known Wisconsin Democrats decided not to run for governor in 2018 - dramatically thinning the field. They include Congressman Ron Kind and state Sen. Minority Leader Jennifer Schilling, along with former state Sen. Tim Cullen of Janesville. Cullen concluded he could not generate what he’d need to challenge a two-time incumbent.

LaToya Dennis

During a stop in Wauwatosa Wednesday, Governor Walker revealed more about his upcoming two-year budget proposal. He said he's ready to put forth money to help keep families intact, while revamping the welfare system.

Walker said he wants to adjust the Earned Income Tax Credit - a program he trimmed in 2011. The governor told the audience at the Wauwatosa Rotary Club that he plans to eliminate the EITC's marriage penalty.

Gov. Scott Walker
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During his seventh State of the State address on Tuesday, Gov. Walker said the state of Wisconsin is as strong as it has ever been.

Walker vowed to prioritize K12 and college education, transportation and broadband expansion in his upcoming budget. 

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Wisconsin is asking federal lawmakers for more control. Gov. Walker on Tuesday addressed a letter to President-elect Donald Trump asking for more flexibility in administering federal programs. 

For instance, Walker wants to drug test people who apply for Food Share benefits and control the number of certain refugees allowed to settle in the state. Walker says the changes would help the citizens of Wisconsin.              

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Gov. Scott Walker is strongly hinting that he’ll run for a third term in 2018. 

Walker swept into office in the tea party wave of 2010, while Republicans took both houses of the Legislature. He dropped jaws when he announced he would gut public unions, then he was able to pass other landmark pieces of legislation, including statewide expansion of voucher schools. But, there are challenges ahead, should he decide to mount another campaign.

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley said Tuesday the fact that Republicans now control the White House, Congress and so many governors' mansions has left her "giddy."

Haley and the rest of the Republican Governors Association are meeting this week in Orlando, Fla., to discuss their party's victories last week and how they hope to work with President-elect Donald Trump.

The U.S. Supreme Court announced on Monday that it would not hear Wisconsin’s John Doe case. John Doe had been looking into whether Gov. Walker’s 2012 recall campaign and third party funders illegally collaborated. Wisconsin’s Supreme Court had ordered an end to the probe, but prosecutors wanted to continue. Monday they lost that petition. Former state Supreme Court Justice Janine Geske says there are several reasons why John Doe likely didn’t make the cut.

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Update: Three Republican legislators are requesting an investigation into who leaked the secret John Doe documents to The Guardian. Assemblymen Robin Vos, Jim Steineke and John Nygren have sent a letter to Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel, asking him to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate, insisting the person responsible committed a crime.

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UW System

Gov. Scott Walker came under fire by UW System administrators and others last year, after his proposed biennial budget suggested altering the mission of the UW System.

For more than 100 years, the Wisconsin Idea has been in place. The mission, which is described in state statutes, says, in part, that the public university system must "extend knowledge and its application beyond the boundaries of its campuses." The statement also says that inherent in the UW System's mission is "public service designed to educate people and improve the human condition."

Andy Stenz

Gov. Scott Walker sparked outcry in a news conference February 11, 2011. That's when he announced Act 10. It ended public union rights, except the ability to bargain for limited wage increases. Fire and police unions were spared.

"We have to reform the wage and benefit process here in the state of Wisconsin," Walker said.

Walker argued for Act 10, saying it would help the state control spending and reduce debt.

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On Tuesday night, Gov. Scott Walker discussed his efforts to pull Wisconsin out of the Great Recession while also promising that anybody who wants a job, can get one.

It was the governor’s first state of the state address since he ended his presidential bid in September. Walker’s speech focused largely on commitments to education.

Gov. Walker began his 40-minute speech by ticking off a list of accomplishments since he first took office in 2011. He says Wisconsin has come back strong from the Great Recession that gripped the nation for several years.

Susan Bence

Gov. Walker on Thursday threw his support behind Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan to succeed John Boehner as Speaker of the House. Walker says Ryan is the best person for the job.

“He’s someone who has incredible respect not only within his conference, but he has respect across the aisle (be)cause he’s a doer. He gets things done,” Walker says.

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This fall in Madison, a continued partisan divide seems likely as state lawmakers get busy. Republicans and Democrats are pushing widely different agendas. A couple factors -- including the end of Gov. Walker's presidential campaign -- could influence what bills pass.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos says Republicans, who hold the majority in his house and the Senate, have a full slate of business. He outlined the party's plans at the Capitol late last week.

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Gov. Walker returned to work this week at the State Capitol following his exit from the presidential race.

Walker faces the lowest approval ratings of his career as he settles back in to this duties. The latest Marquette Law School poll indicates that only 39 percent of state voters approve of the job he’s doing as governor.

One of the biggest issues people had with Gov. Walker’s presidential run: he just wasn’t around very much, according to JR Ross. He’s editor of wispolitics.com.

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