hate crimes

Across Wisconsin, Recent Rises in Hate, Bias Incidents Spark Concern

Nov 12, 2017
Courtesy of Jeff Glaze

The contentious 2016 presidential election raised religious and racial tensions, but experts say the fears fueling hate and bias incidents began years earlier.

The reports came in at an alarming pace. A student at a middle school near Milwaukee drew a stick figure with a swastika on its face. The image held a gun pointed at another stick figure, which had the name of the student’s Jewish teacher on it.

Following a local television report stating that someone beat and cut a Muslim woman on Milwaukee's south side early Monday - after demanding she take off her hijab, the Council on American-Islamic Relations has called for a hate crimes investigation.

Dave Reid, flickr

Twice, in recent months, someone vandalized a room Marquette University has turned into an Islamic prayer space and nearby hallways signs. The first incident reportedly occurred following November's presidential election; the second, after President Trump released his revised travel ban against about a half-dozen predominantly Muslim nations.

fullempty / Fotolia

Since the November election, reported incidents of overt hostility towards minorities and immigrants have increased. From physical altercations to poison pen letters and internet comments, some people seem to feel emboldened by the election results to express opinions that are at best unkind and at worst racist, misogynistic or homophobic.

It’s been one year since a white supremacist opened fire killing six people and injuring several others at the Sikh Temple in Oak Creek.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says the government will keep numbers on hate crimes against seven groups.