health care

wladimir1804 / Fotolia

For State of Wisconsin employees, including employees at UW-Milwaukee, the health insurance open enrollment period brought a lot of questions. Most of the insurance companies who previously offered coverage will no longer do so in 2018.  State employees in the Milwaukee area have only two companies to choose from.

One is the Menasha-based Network Health, which also made the recent decision to remain on the Milwaukee County exchange, despite uncertainty about the Affordable Care Act’s future. 

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

President Trump's decision Thursday to end subsidy payments to health insurance companies is expected to raise premiums for middle-class families and cost the federal government hundreds of billions of dollars.

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday that is intended to provide more options for people shopping for health insurance. The president invoked his power of the pen after repeated Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, have failed.

"The competition will be staggering," Trump said. "Insurance companies will be fighting to get every single person signed up. And you will be, hopefully, negotiating, negotiating, negotiating. And you will get such low prices for such great care."

Courtesy of Planned Parenthood

This week, the US House of Representatives passed a 20-week abortion ban. The announcement came just days after both houses of Congress failed to renew the Children's Health Insurance Program, and a day before the Trump Administration issued a rule limiting women's access to birth control.

The latest Republican push to repeal key parts of the Affordable Care Act appears to have met the fate of all previous Senate repeal efforts this year — it doesn't have the votes needed to pass the chamber.

Maine Sen. Susan Collins announced Monday that she will oppose the bill, authored by South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham and Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy. Collins' decision means three Republicans have now publicly said they are against the bill — and that is one more than the GOP could afford to lose.

elenabsl / Fotolia

The clock is ticking for Republican Congressional leaders hoping to pass healthcare reform legislation as part of the budget reconciliation process. September 30th is the deadline for a measure to pass the Senate with a simple majority. Earlier this week, a bipartisan effort to offer changes reportedly stalled. Taking its place was a measure cosponsored by Senators Cassidy and Graham. But that bill faces opposition from governors on both sides of the aisle, and its future is uncertain.

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

Sen. John McCain may, once again, be the savior of President Barack Obama's signature domestic achievement.

The Arizona Republican announced in a statement on Friday that he opposes the latest GOP legislation to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

It wasn't that long ago that the effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act died once and for all in the Senate.

Mitch Teich

Despite the politically polarized climate, the U.S. Senate this week held bipartisan hearings on proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act.  The hearings come in the wake of a failed effort by the White House and GOP Congressional leaders to repeal and replace the law known as Obamacare over the summer.

The bipartisanship has been greeted by many as a welcome change, and some analysts are optimistic that it could lead to legislation that would make the AC work more smoothly.

In a moment of unexpected high drama, Republicans were stymied once again in their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and they have John McCain to thank for it.

In the early morning hours Friday, the senator showed why he earned the nickname "Maverick" over his long tenure.

Jeramey Jannene / Flickr

Milwaukee’s place as a hub for human trafficking has attracted media attention both locally and internationally. The Federal Bureau of Investigation confirms that the city has a significant problem, especially when it comes to adolescents being trafficked.

But a number of organizations are undertaking efforts to alleviate the problem. Among them is Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, which is working to better educate medical providers in identifying and helping children who may be the victim of exploitation.

Washington State House Republicans / Flickr

Until a few days ago, Senate Republican leaders had been saying they hoped to vote on their version of the bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act before the July 4 holiday.  That plan went by the wayside amid opposition to the secretly drafted legislation from Democrats and some Republicans, as well.

The Affordable Care Act isn't perfect. Even proponents of the law would agree with that.

In many parts of the country, there is only one insurer in the individual markets — and in a few, there are zero. Premiums have spiked, sending some people on the insurance exchanges hunting for new plans.

Updated 3:30 p.m. ET

With their health care bill facing a perilous path, Senate Republican leaders have decided to push off a vote until after Congress returns from next week's July Fourth recess, GOP aides confirm to NPR's Susan Davis.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pages