health care

It’s been a little more than two weeks since House Republicans unveiled their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle have lined up to blast it. Yet, Speaker Paul Ryan says the House will vote on an updated version Thursday.

President Trump made the trip up Pennsylvania Avenue to close the deal with members of his own party on a bill that, on the face of it, does what Republicans have been promising to do for years: Repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

He came with a tough love message for members of his own party.

"Looks like you'd be ripe for a primary if you don't keep your promise," the president told the group of lawmakers in a closed-door meeting, according to Rep. Blake Farenthold. "He did say that," the Texas Republican adds.

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President Donald Trump campaigned on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and has voiced strong support for the American Health Care Plan, which would weaken the landmark legislation. But although the new bill continues to make its way through the House, it remains intensely controversial among both Democrats and Republicans.

The Republican Party's most passionate pitch man for its health care bill was at it again Wednesday morning with the same message: Everything is going according to plan.

"This is the plan we ran on all of last year. This is the plan that we've been working — House, Senate, White House — together on," House Speaker Paul Ryan told FOX Business News. "Now as we get closer to finish, going through the committee process, you inevitably make those refinements and improvements as you go through that process. That's exactly where we are right now."

Senator Tammy Baldwin / Facebook

Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Republican politicians have vowed to repeal and replace the landmark legislation known to many as "Obamacare."

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When it comes to replacing the Affordable Care Act, a couple Wisconsin leaders from different parties have one thing in common. Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Republican Gov. Scott Walker both expect the GOP plan to continue to evolve before Congress votes on it.

Both of the elected officials commented on the measure Tuesday.

A new report finds that the Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would reduce the federal deficit by $337 billion over a decade but would also leave 24 million more Americans uninsured during that same period.

Many people are worried about how potential changes to the federal health law might affect them. But few are as concerned as those with pre-existing health conditions.

U.S. Congress

Millions of Americans will experience major changes to their health coverage if both chambers of Congress pass the Republican health care bill that's currently under consideration in the House of Representatives.

"This is the chance. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," said the speaker, roving the stage with a wireless mic, gesturing at both the audience in front of him and the PowerPoint presentation behind him.

TED Talk? Late-night infomercial? Nope — it was House Speaker Paul Ryan, making a hard pitch for his health care plan after a week of loud conservative criticism.

Got questions about the GOP plan to overhaul federal health law? Join us on Twitter Thursday 12-1 p.m. ET for our #ACAchat. Kaiser's Julie Rovner, NPR's Alison Kodjak and health policy analysts of various political persuasions will be online discussing how the Republican plan could work, who wins and who loses. See you there!

After literally years of promises, House Republicans have a bill they say will "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act.

After years of waiting, it's finally here.

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A few years ago, the Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum reported the state was facing a looming nursing shortage, due to an aging population and an aging workforce. 

A recent collaboration announced seeks to close that nursing gap. A $2.3 million fund from United Healthcare’s United Health Foundation to Milwaukee Area Technical College, or MATC, stands to greatly increase the college's ability to educate nurses.

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President Trump vowed a repeal of the Affordable Care Act throughout his campaign and one of his first moves as president was seen as the initial step toward that campaign promise. But healthcare has fallen out of the headlines in the days since then, replaced by other issues.

Marti Mikkelson

Tuesday is the deadline for people to enroll in former President Obama’s signature health care plan, the Affordable Care Act. UW-Milwaukee has been urging students to enroll while they still can – if they are uninsured. We spoke with several who attended a recent sign-up session on campus.

Jacqueline Howell is a junior at UWM, majoring in global studies. She says she turned 26 this month and that meant she could no longer remain on her parents’ health insurance. The Affordable Care Act sets the limit at 26. So now, Howell has to sign up for her own plan.

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