health care

Ann Althouse, Flickr

Republican budget leaders are sticking with Gov. Walker’s plan for BadgerCare.

Crown Publishing

How can we ensure that researchers aren't using our biological material without our consent?

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

A new study examines why so few people are signing up to participate in medical trials.

Alex E. Proimos, Flickr

With the largest portion of the healthcare reform bill not set to go into law until next year, new research indicates the law is already having an impact on one population.

The study by the Rand Corporation and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services indicates healthcare reform measures are already shielding young adults - under age 26 - from steep medical costs linked to emergency medical care.

ABCD

Much of the public effort surrounding breast cancer involves raising money for research and awareness. But for people who are diagnosed with the disease – and their families – the needs are often much more personal.

Hospital for Special Surgery, New York/GE Healthcare

Metal joint implants are wreaking havoc on the MRI images doctors use to determine treatment, but a new process improves picture quality.

In 10 months, the Affordable Care Act moves into full force.

Kenneth Munson, regional director of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, says starting in October, Wisconsin residents can enroll in the state’s health insurance exchange or marketplace. Gov. Walker opted not to create it, so the federal government is doing the job.

Gov. Walker
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gov. Scott Walker announced Friday that Wisconsin will not create its own health insurance exchange, as part of the federal Affordable Care Act. Walker says he will leave the responsibility to the federal government.

Update: Gov. Walker announces that Wisconsin will not create its own health insurance exchange.

Gov. Scott Walker has until Friday Nov. 16 to announce whether Wisconsin will create its own health care exchange under the Affordable Care Act. If the state refuses, the federal government will create Wisconsin's exchange.

StateHealthFacts.org

Governor Walker will announce his decision Friday, as to whether Wisconsin will create a state-run health insurance exchange or rely on the federal government to develop a plan.

WUWM inquired about Kentucky’s plan – that state is months ahead in planning its exchange.

While Wisconsin remains among the states yet to take formal steps toward creating a health care exchange, Chris Murray, a lecturer at Marquette University's Les Aspin Center for Government in Washington, describes opposition to the Affordable Care Act as waning.

Although the U.S. Supreme Court upheld it this year, the fate of the president’s health care overhaul was uncertain until the election. Governors, such as Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, put off implementing portions of the Affordable Care Act until after the vote, hoping the law would fall, if the president did. However, despite Obama’s victory last week, Gov. Walker has not yet made public his plans for meeting a key demand of the law. As WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl reports, interested parties are waiting, as a deadline approaches.

Erin Toner

We now continue our series on Wisconsin’s efforts to improve the health of children in foster care. Child welfare officials admit the existing system is not meeting many kids’ needs. As we reported Tuesday, the children’s health records are often incomplete and scattered among the many caregivers and doctors who’ve passed through the kids’ lives. To address the problem, the state plans to roll out a “medical home” program that would centralize each child’s care. Today, WUWM’s Erin Toner highlights another state initiative – a sharper focus on helping children heal from trauma and abuse.

Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare
Erin Toner

The state of Wisconsin says it will soon roll out a new health care system for children in foster care. They often have far more serious medical and mental health needs than peers, yet people involved with the children say, too often, their needs are not met. In the first of a two-part series, WUWM’s Erin Toner reports on a big shortcoming of the current health care system for foster children – their medical records are scattered and incomplete. What the state plans to do to address the problem, is create for each child, a “medical home.”

One of the biggest financial burdens individuals and businesses face is the rising cost of health care. In order to ease that weight, some people and employers have been turning to High Deductible Health Care Plans. They keep monthly premiums low by requiring patients to spend a significant amount of money before their insurance kicks-in. As WUWM’s LaToya Dennis reports, those high deductible plans can pay off, but are a gamble.

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