healthcare

Lisa F. Young, fotolia

A few years ago, the Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum reported the state was facing a looming nursing shortage, due to an aging population and an aging workforce. 

A recent collaboration announced seeks to close that nursing gap. A $2.3 million fund from United Healthcare’s United Health Foundation to Milwaukee Area Technical College, or MATC, stands to greatly increase the college's ability to educate nurses.

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President Trump vowed a repeal of the Affordable Care Act throughout his campaign and one of his first moves as president was seen as the initial step toward that campaign promise. But healthcare has fallen out of the headlines in the days since then, replaced by other issues.

Marti Mikkelson

Tuesday is the deadline for people to enroll in former President Obama’s signature health care plan, the Affordable Care Act. UW-Milwaukee has been urging students to enroll while they still can – if they are uninsured. We spoke with several who attended a recent sign-up session on campus.

Jacqueline Howell is a junior at UWM, majoring in global studies. She says she turned 26 this month and that meant she could no longer remain on her parents’ health insurance. The Affordable Care Act sets the limit at 26. So now, Howell has to sign up for her own plan.

The Trump administration has canceled the latest round of federally sponsored advertising and outreach aimed at encouraging people to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

The $5 million in ads was aimed at getting as many people as possible to sign up for insurance by the Jan. 31 deadline for open enrollment.

Republicans have a plan to replace Obamacare. In fact, they have several.

What they don't have is consensus on which one will guide the party's effort to reshape an insurance system that provides coverage for some 20 million Americans.

Marge Pitrof

The Obama administration's Affordable Care Act is not perfect, but it has enabled the United States to take a major step forward in making health insurance available to all Americans, multiple speakers told a crowd Sunday morning, on Milwaukee's south side.

President Obama meets with Democrats on Capitol Hill today, looking for ways to preserve his signature health care law in the face of stiff Republican opposition.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Congress returned to session on Tuesday. One item Republican lawmakers promise to repeal, and in short order, is President Obama’s signature health care law – the Affordable Care Act.

In Wisconsin, the data shows that more than 173,000 people now get their health insurance through the ACA.  With its future in doubt, WUWM asked several providers what they’re advising people who are looking for insurance.

Lawmakers returned to Washington and wasted no time getting to work on the repeal of Obamacare.

Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., introduced a resolution just hours after the new Congress convened Tuesday that will serve as the vehicle for repealing much of the president's signature health care law.

President-elect Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan agree that repealing the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with some other health insurance system is a top priority.

But they disagree on whether overhauling Medicare should be part of that plan. Medicare is the government-run health system for people age 65 and older and the disabled.

Trump said little about Medicare during his campaign, other than to promise that he wouldn't cut it.

Ryan, on the other hand, has Medicare in his sights.

Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress are vowing to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the signature health care overhaul of President Obama.

Trump has offered a few ideas of where he'd like to see a health care overhaul go, such as a greater reliance on health savings accounts, but he hasn't provided a detailed proposal.

Mitch Teich

President-elect Donald Trump made "repeal and replacement" of the Affordable Care Act a central talking point in his campaign.  Now that he's been elected, analysts and people covered by the act, referred to as Obamacare, are trying to anticipate how Trump's pledge will translate to reality.

Barbara Zabawa fits both those descriptions.  She's a Madison-based attorney, heading the Center for Health and Wellness Law - and she's covered by the ACA.  Zabawa says you can bet on one certainty in the months to come: change.

Kelly Becker

The price of EpiPens has surged by 450 percent since 2004. They used to cost around $100 for two, but now average more than $600 each. That drastic price hike means many parents are now struggling to find the money to pay for the medicine that could save their child’s life.

Kelly Becker has two children with severe food allergies, and any time her kids eat, there could be a reaction. Becker talks about the time her daughter accidentally ate regular ice cream at her birthday party, rather than the soy that had been set aside for her:

Ann-Elise Henzl

There's a new plan in Wisconsin to cut the growing cost of prescription drugs. The idea involves having the state analyze drug prices to determine whether they're reasonable.

State Rep. Deb Kolste says there's a simple reason Wisconsin should investigate medicine prices.

"Drug costs are rising at a much faster pace than wages, inflation and even the rest of health care," she says.

LaToya Dennis

President Obama came to Milwaukee Thursday to congratulate the city on beating out 19 others when it came to registering uninsured residents for health insurance.

The President championed his Affordable Care Act saying it has lowered the number of uninsured Americans to below 10 percent.

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