history

Pfister Hotel

The Pfister Hotel has always been a place of opulence and luxury. During its 125 year history, it has been host to countless important events and dignitaries, including visits from Prussian royalty and American presidents. Now, Anna Lardinois has the chance to share and become a part of the hotel's history.

Courtesy of UWM Cultural Resource Management

From 1882 until 1974, the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery served as the burial site of many of Milwaukee’s marginalized citizens. The cemetery became the final resting place for many of the community’s poor, as well as those who died as a resident of one of the county institutions or were unidentified or unclaimed from the coroner’s office.

Michail Takach

1968 was a pivotal year for so many facets of American culture, from the anti-war and civil rights movements, to rapidly changing musical styles, to women’s rights. It was also a time of great change in America’s gay society. While the Stonewall riots in New York City didn’t happen until a year later, 1968 was a crucial year in Milwaukee’s gay history, especially in the Walker’s Point neighborhood.

Simon & Schuster

There are some notable addresses and iconic homes around the United States, but one has stood the test of time and remains the largest home on U.S. soil.  The Biltmore Estate, built in the late 19th century in Ashville, North Carolina, is a colossal mansion built by George Vanderbilt.

Wikimedia Commons

Most talk about weapons today involves firearms.  But one Milwaukee museum curator wanted to examine how our weaponry even evolved to firearms. Through exploring humans and their behavior, Milwaukee Public Museum Anthropology Collections Curator Dawn Scher Thomae sees the weapon as a tool that has evolved over thousands of years to solve a problem.

Aisha Turner

This week’s Bubbler Talk is rooted deep in Wisconsin history... in the story of escaped slave Joshua Glover. Glover fled Missouri for Wisconsin in 1852 and was imprisoned in Milwaukee under the Fugitive Slave Law.

You can see parts of his story driving on Fond du Lac towards Milwaukee’s downtown. A large mural spans the walls of the I-43 underpass. It depicts abolitionists storming the jail, helping Glover escape to freedom in Canada.

Wikimedia Commons

Today is the first Tuesday in November, which is typically the fall election day in this country. A year ago, Donald Trump was elected president, and a year from today, people will go to the polls in Wisconsin to vote in the gubernatorial, Congressional, Senate, and state legislative races.

Dennis Andersen

Folk singer Arlo Guthrie doesn't mind if "Alice's Restaurant" is still the first thing that pops to mind when you hear his name.  Guthrie doesn't play it at every show - in fact, he's not planning to play it in Milwaukee Friday night.  But he understands that his fans' love for a fifty-year-old song is as much about themselves as it is about the songwriter.

"Manlife" Documentary

If you’ve ever taken a drive south along I-94, you might remember seeing a roadside sign in Sturtevant - near Racine - that advertised the "University of Lawsonomy." Or you might have seen the painted sign on a barn that says “Study Natural Law.”

The "law" in question is Lawsonomy: a utopian movement that began in 1929 by Alfred Lawson, a British immigrant who, before he started the eponymous Lawsonomy, founded two Wisconsin airplane manufacturers, and is credited as the inventor of the first passenger airliner.

solidarity-us.org

Jesus Salas has been involved in nearly every aspect of the agriculture and migrant worker movement in Wisconsin - from founding Obreros Unidos to being CEO of United Migrant Opportunity Services.

As a child, Salas and his family traveled from Crystal City, Texas to the Great Lakes Region to cultivate and harvest crops. In 1959, the family settled in Wautoma, where the young Salas (a third-generation migrant worker) became actively involved in fighting for the rights of improving migrant workers.

Safe House Milwaukee

For a half-century, the Milwaukee restaurant - the Safe House has served a helping of Cold War history alongside burgers, fries, and drinks.  The restaurant was founded by Dave Baldwin, a connoisseur of the Cold War and espionage.  The ownership changed hands more recently, but the walls of the Safe House are still adorned with memorabilia from the Cold War era.

And while its day-to-day missions are food and entertainment, the restaurant not long ago hosted two people with strong connections to the Cold War.

Wisconsin Black Historical Society

The summer of 1967 was violent all across the country. Just as in other cities, black residents in Milwaukee tired of unequal treatment and the lack of opportunity hit their breaking point and a riot ensued.

“The creation of deindustrialization was in full bloom. People don’t have jobs. Things got bad. Depression, unemployment and poverty began to blanket the city so it just exploded,” Clayborn Benson says.

He is the executive director of the Wisconsin Black Historical Society.

Tafkas / Wikimedia

Growing up, writers Rachel Kadish and Jessica Shattuck learned about World War II from their grandparents, but they heard somewhat different stories.

Alliance Francaise

From Solomon Juneau to Jean Nicolet, there are many French names we recognize in Milwaukee.

Anne Leplae and Mary Emory of the Alliance Française de Milwaukee want Wisconsinites to understand the French history and culture that permeates in Wisconsin beyond this week’s Bastille Days celebration.

Penguin Random House

This month marks the 100th anniversary of the official entry of the United States into the First World War. The US had been fighting wars along the Mexico border and in Cuba before it entered the European conflict in 1917.  But it took WWI to turn the United States into the global military power it has become.

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