Milwaukee Unrest

Marti Mikkelson

Efforts to connect people to jobs on Milwaukee’s north side jumped into high gear a year ago, after the unrest that broke out in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

It followed a police officer’s fatal shooting of a black man, Sylville Smith. Some people joined the protests, to also raise concerns about jobs and economic opportunity. After the dust settled, community leaders called for an end to the persistent unemployment that has plagued the north side.

WUWM examines the job outlook for the area one year later.

Scott Meyers, Milwaukee PBS

This weekend marks the first anniversary of the unrest that rocked Milwaukee's Sherman Park neighborhood.

People angry about a fatal police shooting -- and also a lack of jobs and opportunity -- protested. Some in the crowd set buildings on fire and shot weapons into the air, as they faced off against police officers in riot gear.

Today, the neighborhood is still struggling to get a handle on the longstanding issues. So is the rest of the city.

Marti Mikkelson

Former Milwaukee Police Officer Dominque Heaggan-Brown heard the words “not guilty” in court on Wednesday as did the family of Sylville Smith. A jury decided the former officer should not be criminally responsible for fatally shooting of Smith last summer, a killing that sparked two nights of violence in the Sherman Park neighborhood. The jury deliberated for ten hours over two days, and after Judge Jeffrey Conen announced the verdict, Smith's family members sobbed.

Michael Sears/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/pool photo

Cries of disapproval filled the courtroom on Wednesday afternoon, after a Milwaukee jury found former police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown not guilty of reckless homicide. He shot and killed 23-year-old Sylville Smith following a foot chase last summer, igniting two days of violence in the city's Sherman Park neighborhood.

Monday, jury selection will begin in Milwaukee for former police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown. He fatally shot 23-year-old Sylville Smith last summer. The killing sparked two-days of violence in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

For 48 hours last August, Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood captured people’s attention across the country. What they saw on TV were images of police in riot gear, buildings burning and crowds of angry people. It followed the police killing of a young black man. A few days later, we spoke with community activist Camille Mays.

Rachel Morello

Six months after violence shook Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood, it’s pretty much “business as usual” at a couple local schools. Leaders there aren’t sure if being at status quo is a good or a bad thing – or perhaps both.

Marti Mikkelson

It has been six months since a Milwaukee police officer shot and killed an armed suspect in the Sherman Park neighborhood, sparking two nights of unrest. Protesters destroyed or damaged several businesses in the area of Sherman and Burleigh, particularly the gas station located at the foot of the park. WUWM visited the epicenter of the unrest to ask neighbors how things are going, a half-year later.

Milwaukee Police

Dominique Heaggan-Brown has been charged with first-degree reckless homicide in the death of Sylville Smith.

The former Milwaukee police officer is accused of pursuing  Smith after a traffic stop in the Sherman Park neighborhood in August. Heaggan-Brown is African American, as was Smith.

If convicted, the former officer could face up to 60 years imprisonment.

Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm's decision to charge Heaggan-Brown was made public in court documents on Thursday.

Disciplinary proceedings are now underway against the Milwaukee police officer, whose actions sparked unrest in the Sherman Park Neighborhood. He fatally shot Sylville Smith in August.

The District Attorney has not announced whether he’ll file charges in that case. But the DA has now charged Officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown with five counts of sexual misconduct. The new accusations stem from an attack that allegedly happened the same weekend as the shooting.

Michelle Maternowski

Like many of her fellow Milwaukeeans, Lynne Woehrle was sad to hear the news of protests and violence in Sherman Park over the summer.

Mike De Sisti, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

On August 13th, all eyes turned to Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood. Protesters jumped on police cars and set buildings on fire, outraged over the police shooting of Sylville Smith.

LaToya Dennis

Sylville Smith, the African American man killed by a black police officer two weeks ago was laid to rest Friday.

Rev. Jesse Jackson traveled to Milwaukee to give the eulogy. Jackson said that while this funeral could not have been prevented, maybe others will. The only way that will happen, he said, is if people are given not only hope, but jobs.

Copyright 2017 Milwaukee Public Radio. To see more, visit Milwaukee Public Radio.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

LaToya Dennis

Friday in Milwaukee, family and friends of Sylville Smith will lay him to rest. He’s the 23-year-old African American a police officer shot and killed on August 13 near the Sherman Park neighborhood.

In the hours following, anger reached a fever pitch as protestors set businesses on fire and attacked police. The city bolstered its force and imposed a 10 P.M. curfew for teens, and since things seem to have simmered.

But it might not last long if conditions don’t improve for struggling residents, according Jay Holmes and Camille Mays.

Wisconsin’s two candidates for U.S. Senate have been crisscrossing the state this summer, talking about issues that matter to voters. In Milwaukee lately, people have been concerned about a fatal police shooting and violence in the Sherman Park neighborhood. Republican Sen. Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold have weighed in on Milwaukee’s struggles. The two have differing solutions.

While speaking to the Kiwanis Club in Milwaukee, incumbent Sen. Ron Johnson says the violence that broke out near Sherman Park is understandable.

Pages