On That Note

courtesy of Robert Cohen

Robert Cohen is an internationally recognized cellist who joins Lake Effect each month to talk about the life of a working classical musician. It's a series we call On That Note.

Cohen is no stranger to working with young musicians - a great part of his career is about teaching young, aspiring cellists, students who hope to perform on the world's concert stages one day. But more recently, Cohen has also been working with students who have no such dreams or professional expectations. These older adults choose to learn to play the cello for other reasons.

HIBROW.TV

What do you know about Bulgaria? Most of us, if we have any thoughts about it, think of a dark mysterious place behind the Iron Curtain. And though democracy came to Eastern Europe in the 1990s, Bulgaria still brings to mind a place largely closed off from the modern developed world.

Of course, that's not exactly the case in 2018. It’s a place where cellist Robert Cohen recently performed, and for this month’s On That Note segment, he joins Bonnie North to talk about the experience. Cohen says he was actually excited to be back in that part of the world.

courtesy of Robert Cohen

Johann Sebastian Bach's 6 Suites for Unaccompanied Cello are masterworks of the Baroque era. They are beautiful to hear and fiendishly difficult to play, and they are considered among the greatest of Bach's many brilliant compositions.

Each suite contains six movements, and performing just one of them during a concert requires a great deal of concentration and skill on the part of the cellist. But to perform all six during a single concert? That's a marathon.

Robert Cohen

This month's On That Note is all about everyone’s second favorite topic - the weather.

For most of us, weather is either nice or annoying. But musicians monitor temperatures and humidity levels with a devotion verging on the fanatical. Their livelihoods depend upon both their bodies and their instruments being in the best condition possible. And when temperatures are particularly cold and dry, it's hard on both.

Juan-Miguel Hernandez

Each month cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect to talk about life as a touring classical musician. This month, we find Cohen making a big professional change: After 6 years, he performed his final concerts as a member of the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet. Cohen is returning to a predominantly solo career.

Jay Lawrence

Did you have the chance to take in any live music over the holidays? Whether it’s a performance of The Nutcracker, or holiday pops music, music is an integral part of the holiday season for many of us.

Fine Arts Quartet

Every month cellist Robert Cohen talks about his life as a professional musician in a segment called On That Note. The conversations range from how to travel with a cello to how to best memorize music, and a wide array of other topics that explore what it means to work as a musician. 

Bonnie North

Cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect each month in a series we call On That Note. We talk about everything from travel challenges to how to memorize music as we explore the life of a professional classical musician.

We’re changing it up a bit this month because this time Robert was able to bring along his Fine Arts Quartet colleague, violist Juan-Miguel Hernandez. And when you have such high caliber musicians in your studio, talking is good (and we do chat a bit after the music), but a concert is better.

HIBROW.TV

Cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect every month for On That Note, an ongoing conversation about the life of a touring classical musician.

Recently, Cohen made a large technological leap, which he's been contemplating for years. He bought a tablet. "I am now using an iPad on a special stand to read my music," he explains. 

angelo.gi / Fotolia

Each month, cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect to talk about the life of a professional classical musician. Our On That Note series has tackled everything from traveling with an extremely rare and valuable instrument too large for the overhead bin to what it’s like to perform with musicians who were once your students.

J-P Masclet

Cellist Robert Cohen joins us every month to talk about the life of working classical musician for the segment: On That Note with Robert Cohen.

This month, Robert is preparing for a series of concerts and is revisiting a piece of music he hasn’t played in a long time. And as it turns out it's an interesting process.

"I'm playing a piece that I haven't played for at least 25 years...and it's really fascinating coming back to kind of re-learn a piece that I've barely even thought about for all of that time," says Cohen.

HiBrow.tv

On That Note contributor Robert Cohen was finishing a series of concerts with the Fine Arts Quartet here in Milwaukee when he joined Lake Effect for our monthly conversation about making music. This time, he was mulling over a question that a friend of his had asked him after a recent performance: what did he think about when he was playing?

Courtesy of Robert Cohen

On That Note contributor Robert Cohen often joins Lake Effect from remote locations around the world. But this month, the professional cellist was back in Milwaukee for a concert with the Fine Arts Quartet. 

This was a particularly noteworthy concert for Cohen, because he had a chance to play with a former student. Musicians often inhabit a unique world in which they're both students and teachers at the same time, so it isn't unusual for him to have an opportunity to work with his former students. 

courtesy of Robert Cohen

Lake Effect talks with cellist Robert Cohen every month about the life of a working classical musician in our regular segment, called On That Note

All of us in the work world face the inevitable push-pull of our home and work lives. But when that tension is present during a rehearsal or a performance, Cohen says there are some unique challenges, like using it as a way to go deeper into the music.

Lorenzo Lotto / Archivio fotografico Gallerie dell’Accademia

Each month, cellist Robert Cohen joins us for a segment for an inside look into the life of a professional classical musician.

This month, Cohen had the opportunity to perform in a very special room at the Brera Gallery in Milan, Italy, for the opening of a Lorenzo Lotto exhibition. He was part of a series that linked the mentality of the painters and sculptures to the mentality of the composers of the pieces chosen to accompany the art work.

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