Project Milwaukee

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Armando is a 36-year-old Milwaukeean, a certified carpenter, and a very proud dad. But he is also a former inmate of a state correctional facility.

Susan Bence

In the final phase of our Project Milwaukee series on black men in prison, we’re examining efforts to reduce the numbers.

LaToya Dennis

While Milwaukee is the epicenter when it comes to the number of black men who’ve served time in Wisconsin’s prisons, it's not the only community feeling the pain.

Police Seek End to "Get Even" Violence

Mar 21, 2014
Bob Bach

A Milwaukee police commander disputes the contention that officers are stopping too many African American males.

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Traffic stops are just one of several strategies Milwaukee police are using to curtail disorder in high crime neighborhoods.

Bob Bach

Milwaukee police must be vigilant to stop a myriad of illegal activities in vacant homes.

Ann-Elise Henzl

One of Milwaukee's most outspoken advocates for racial justice is calling Wisconsin's disproportionate incarceration of black men an "undeclared state of emergency."

Erin Toner

There’s a part of Milwaukee where every residential block has multiple numbers of men who’ve served time in prison - the 53206 zip code on the city’s north side.

Wisconsin incarcerates black men at a rate higher than every other state. For thousands of parents this is more than a statistic. A mother shares her reflections.

LaToya Dennis

Project Milwaukee: Black Men in Prison begins exploring how prison time affects the men and those around them.

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A policy analyst and Milwaukee's Chief of Police offer sharply differing opinions on how law enforcement figures into why so many of Milwaukee's black men are in prison.

Center for Driver's License Recovery and Employability

One issue that’s come up repeatedly in our Project Milwaukee interviews on the imprisonment of African American males is driving privileges.

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Many of Milwaukee's poorest residents are dealing with a double-whammy when it comes to access to employment: poverty and suspended driving privileges.

Wisconsin incarcerates black men at staggering rates. WUWM's Susan Bence talks with eight men living the statistics. They are currently serving time at the Milwaukee County House of Correction in Franklin.

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Analysts and advocates say a wide variety of social and cultural factors contribute to the high rate of African American male incarceration in Wisconsin.

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