Sherman Park

Marti Mikkelson

Efforts to connect people to jobs on Milwaukee’s north side jumped into high gear a year ago, after the unrest that broke out in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

It followed a police officer’s fatal shooting of a black man, Sylville Smith. Some people joined the protests, to also raise concerns about jobs and economic opportunity. After the dust settled, community leaders called for an end to the persistent unemployment that has plagued the north side.

WUWM examines the job outlook for the area one year later.

Bonnie Petrie

Violence erupted in the Sherman Park neighborhood a year ago – after a Milwaukee police officer fatally shot an armed suspect. The outburst was partly the result of frustration over stubborn issues that have been plaguing the central city. Among the top concerns – jobs. The incident prompted Gov. Walker to commit $4.5 million to help employ people from central city neighborhoods.

Milwaukee’s unemployment rate has declined from 6.5 percent to five percent in the year since the Sherman Park unrest, according to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.

Scott Meyers, Milwaukee PBS

This weekend marks the first anniversary of the unrest that rocked Milwaukee's Sherman Park neighborhood.

People angry about a fatal police shooting -- and also a lack of jobs and opportunity -- protested. Some in the crowd set buildings on fire and shot weapons into the air, as they faced off against police officers in riot gear.

Today, the neighborhood is still struggling to get a handle on the longstanding issues. So is the rest of the city.

LaToya Dennis

It’s been nearly one year since unrest in Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood captured the nation's attention.

Police in riot gear were deployed to bring control to the area, where people were damaging police cars and setting buildings afire. What set off the unrest was the fatal police shooting of an African American man.

Yet some who flocked to the neighborhood were there to protest the poverty and joblessness impacting many of the city's residents.

Maayan Silver

At the intersection of 47th and Burleigh in Milwaukee's Sherman Park neighborhood, the Kosher Meat Klub and My Barbershop exist side-by-side. Their coexistence reflects a larger respect between the African Americans and Orthodox Jews living in the area.    

Maayan Silver

Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood has attracted its share of attention during the past year. Much of it negative. But, some point to Sherman Park as a success story, it’s one of the most diverse in a metro area considered one of the most segregated in the country.

Michael Sears/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/pool photo

Cries of disapproval filled the courtroom on Wednesday afternoon, after a Milwaukee jury found former police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown not guilty of reckless homicide. He shot and killed 23-year-old Sylville Smith following a foot chase last summer, igniting two days of violence in the city's Sherman Park neighborhood.

Michelle Maternowski

Clifton Pharm describes a slightly different feel to his Sherman Park neighborhood, six months after it was shaken by unrest and a heavy police presence. We met him not long after protesters ransacked and set buildings on fire – upset that a Milwaukee police officer had shot a young black man to death. Pharm was taking his five-year-old granddaughter on a walk to show her what violent actions can produce.

In the days following last summer's unrest in the Sherman Park neighborhood, WUWM met Jay Holmes, a man hoping to help heal his community by creating a mobile fresh food market. Six months later, Holmes talks about the changes he’s noticed. He describes both frustrations and bright spots.

Marti Mikkelson

Not long after violence broke out in Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood in August, Gov. Walker dispatched mobile job banks to the central city. He was responding to the calls for state help, to address the lack of job opportunities in the area. Now, a half-year later, phase two has begun.  On Tuesday, the state announced it was providing several hundred thousand dollars to help train residents for jobs.

LaToya Dennis

Want to purchase a home for a dollar?

The City of Milwaukee has you covered, as long as you meet certain conditions. The city wants to spend several million state dollars, to help people rehabilitate homes in the Sherman Park neighborhood. The program stems from the unrest that occurred there this summer, after a police officer fatally shot a man, and residents raised a host of challenges the area faces. The rehab plan is angering some interested individuals, because, of its conditions.

LaToya Dennis

There is a chaplaincy program in Milwaukee – that responds to crime scenes and fires, and even to the unrest that occurred in Sherman Park this summer.

LaToya Dennis

Access to fresh food is limited in some Milwaukee neighborhoods without full-service grocery stores. Now, a few residents have come up with a plan they call Market Boxx. It would not only bring fresh produce to more people, but also create entrepreneurs, starting in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

Michelle Maternowski

Milwaukee County Circuit Judge David Hansher on Wednesday extended his order that Sherman Park remain open during its regular hours. However, another hearing has been set to consider the bigger issue - what's the legal protocol for deciding when an emergency exists and expires. For now, anyway, the orange fencing is gone.

Original Story from Wednesday Morning:

LaToya Dennis

Friday in Milwaukee, family and friends of Sylville Smith will lay him to rest. He’s the 23-year-old African American a police officer shot and killed on August 13 near the Sherman Park neighborhood.

In the hours following, anger reached a fever pitch as protestors set businesses on fire and attacked police. The city bolstered its force and imposed a 10 P.M. curfew for teens, and since things seem to have simmered.

But it might not last long if conditions don’t improve for struggling residents, according Jay Holmes and Camille Mays.

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